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Mind yr openers: Future Islands and Titus Andronicus upstage Okkervil River

Mind yr openers: Future Islands and Titus Andronicus upstage Okkervil River (photo)

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Last night, Okkervil River headlined a sold-out concert at the Cat’s Cradle, the long-time and legendary North Carolina stopover between Atlanta and Washington, D.C. The Cat’s Cradle holds just more than 500 people, meaning that any two of the three bands on Wednesday night’s bill–Okkervil River, Titus Andronicus and Future Islands, combining for one of the summer’s biggest indie tours–could have sold out the show just fine. The Cradle appearance was the second of the month-long tour, and excitement was high. After all, Future Islands are a Baltimore band, but they’re actually kids from nearby Raleigh. What’s more, neighboring Durham was one of the first towns outside of New England to fall for Titus Andronicus, back before a big record deal and Pitchfork laurels. This was the kind of show, then, where tickets were sold in parking lots, where long-faced indie kids stood close to the entrance in hopes of someone having a spare. It was also the sort of show where you wondered just what Okkervil River is thinking.

Musically, the bill made no sense from the start: Okkervil River makes finely orchestrated, careful indie folk, led by proudly loquacious frontman Will Sheff. It’s well-rehearsed stuff, with little room for error or improvisation. The set was a carousel of instruments, with members swapping out guitars and positions between songs as though they were playing a public game of hot potato.

But Titus Andronicus makes willfully sloppy music, backing their Springsteen-meets-Danzig rants about life in New Jersey with a shoegazer’s feedback, Sousa-sized melodies and a rhythm section that only acknowledges the difference between loud and louder. Patrick Stickles howls and swears and slurs, sometimes only barely clinging to coherence. At one point, a guitar amplifier started feeding back uncontrollably, but no one cared; they just went for it.

Future Islands is three dudes–a keyboardist who stares at his hands, a bassist who stares straight ahead, and Sam Herring, who sings like a cross between Jack Black, Baby Huey and David Tibet. They make electronic soul with a big, thumping pulse, shaping the perfect frame for Herring’s onstage antics. He dances, growls and slaps himself, pushing the emotional hurt of his electronic songs to a visceral hope. They’re one of the most thrilling bands on the road right now.

So, sonically, it didn’t fit, but there was the hope–or the thought, at least–that the bill might gel on the strength of its respective frontpeople. Sheff, Stickles and Herring are a proud triumvirate of leaders, each at the center of their own universe of sound and story. When Herring sings about the woman whose infidelity became the inspiration for these songs, you get the sense that he’s pondered the situation just as much as Stickles has dissected and analyzed his youth, or as much as Sheff has catalogued and parlayed the neuroses he finds in his orbit. But Sheff came off as precious and stiff, with none of the aplomb, ease or enthusiasm of the bands before him.

Neither Titus Andronicus nor Future Islands had ever headlined the Cat’s Cradle; for them, it was a new treat, a chance to see how they sounded in the big room, how they looked for the large crowd. Honestly, they looked inspiring, two bands doing what they have long done with disregard for the careful nature of their hosts. The crowd expelled more energy for the short opening sets than they did for the long headlining performance. They clapped when Stickles demanded it, went crazy when Herring implied it with a slap to his own face and a dip of the hip to the left or right. For Sheff and his perfectly rehearsed pathos, they listened until they started to leave, the exhaustion of a dance party and a shout-along ostensibly leaving no room for introspection. Nominally, it was Okkervil River’s night; in actuality, you sort of pitied their folly.

So, have you ever gone to a show in hopes of seeing the headliner, only to be stunned by the opener and bored by the time the main act hit the stage? Tell us about it.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

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It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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