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Ewan McGregor on “Beginners”‘ Canine Acting Secrets

Ewan McGregor on “Beginners”‘ Canine Acting Secrets (photo)

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In most movies, last billing is reserved for big actors making a small contribution to a film — “Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie… And Guy Pearce” in “The Hurt Locker.” In “Beginners,” last billing goes to Cosmo, the small Jack Russell terrier who makes a big impact on Oliver (Ewan McGregor) after he inherits him from his dead father. As Oliver struggles with his grief over his father’s death, he also struggles with this new companion, who constantly stares at him through intense, soulful eyes.

As most people do when they’re alone with a dog, Oliver starts to have conversations with Arthur. As few dogs do when they’re spoken to by a human, Arthur speaks back via very articulate subtitles (i.e. “Tell her the darkness is about to drown us unless something drastic happens right now.”). They’re funny at first and then actually kind of moving, in part because of the amazing performance from little Cosmo. During my interview with Ewan McGregor last week at the “Beginners” junket, I asked him about Cosmo’s performance and the secrets to acting opposite a canine (spoiler alert: multiple dogs!):

Who’s the greatest dog actor of all time? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter or Facebook!

Bill Murray in Ghostbusters II

Hopebusters, Too

Ghostbusters II Predicted the World Will End on Valentine’s Day 2016

Catch Ghostbusters II this month on IFC. Provided the world doesn't end, of course.

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Photo Credit: Columbia Pictures

Far be it from us to contradict Mr. Bill Murray, but a prediction made in a scene from one of his films is about to be put to the test. If you remember Ghostbusters II, then you know that at the beginning of the film, retired ‘buster Peter Venkman is the host of a chat show called World of the Psychic. According to a guest on the show, the world will end on February 14th, 2016 — this Valentine’s Day.

Now, before you start looting, keep in mind the source of this information is a tad unreliable. Elaine (played by Sid and Nancy star Chloe Webb) sits with Venkman and relates how she received this intel from an alien who may or may not have disguised a UFO to look like a Holiday Inn in Paramus. Let’s just hope she misheard, otherwise there will be some awkward date nights this year.

Check out the grim prognostication in the clip below. Hopefully the world will still be here when Ghostbusters II airs Monday, Feb. 15th and throughout the month on IFC.

James Franco Goes Indie With Josh Lucas In This Exclusive “Shadows And Lies” Clip

James Franco Goes Indie With Josh Lucas In This Exclusive “Shadows And Lies” Clip (photo)

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Over the years, James Franco has carefully managed to straddle both the indie and mainstream worlds. One day he’s pinned under a boulder for Danny Boyle’s “127 Hours,” and then a month later he’s surrounded by talking monkeys for the “Planet of the Apes” prequel. All of that happens concurrently with Franco’s doctoral push at two top-tier universities, as well as a “Three’s Company” project that the actor unveiled at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. With all these projects on his ever-growing plate, somehow Franco also managed to star in a small crime thriller called “Shadows and Lies,” and we’ve got an exclusive look at one of its pinnacle scenes.

In the film, Franco plays an enigmatic criminal who befriends a beautiful call girl who doubles as the favorite eye candy of a dangerous New York gangster (subtly played by Josh Lucas). The tangled situation forces Franco to leave town, but after four years on the run, he returns to claim the woman he loves.

The scene above finds Franco meeting the crime boss for the first time, which results in terse dialogue and careful acting that wouldn’t seem out of place on a Broadway stage. You can see the rest of the star’s interesting performance when the film hits store shelves on June 7.

Will you be checking out James Franco’s “Shadows and Lies”? Chime in below or on Twitter or Facebook.

The 2011 New York Asian Film Festival Lineup

The 2011 New York Asian Film Festival Lineup (photo)

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The Tribeca Film Festival has the stars. The New York Film Festival has the award winners. But the New York Asian Film Festival has the coolest, boldest, and strangest genre movies, and that’s why it holds a special place in my heart. While most festivals specialize in quote-unquote arthouse fare, NYAFF brings the Asian mainstream — the stuff that would almost never play here otherwise — to America.

We’re big fans of the NYAFF at IFC and we’re looking forward to another excellent edition this year. The lineup was just announced and it looks stacked. It includes a few superb films I saw at last year’s Fantastic Fest, including the entertaining exploitation documentary “Machete Maidens Unleashed” from “Not Quite Hollywood” director Mark Hartley. The stuff I’m jazzed to see for the first time includes the world premiere of Takashi Miike’s “Ninja Kids!!!” (their exclamation points, not mine), “Ocean Heaven,” a Chinese drama starring Jet Li and shot by cinematographer Christopher Doyle, “Karate-Robo Zaborgar,” a Japanese film about a cop and his karate-fighting robot (it also transforms into a motorcycle because, damnit, a karate-fighting that doesn’t transform into a robot is a huge waste of time), and a rare big-screen presentation of one of the craziest martial arts movies ever, “Riki Oh: The Story of Riki.” There are also sidebars devoted to Chinese wu xia films (aka fantasy martial arts epics), the current wave of Korean revenge films, and Taiwanese director Su Chao-pin. Plus, they’re giving awards to “13 Assassins” star Takayuki Yamada and legendary Hong Kong action director Tsui Hark.

The full lineup, divided by country, is below. Because names and titles sometimes aren’t enough for these films — because you’ve probably never heard of most of them — I’ve also included the synopses from the NYAFF 2011 press release. The festival runs July 1-14.


CHINA
“Buddha Mountain”
(China, 2010, North American Premiere, 105 minutes)
Gobbling up festival awards around the world, Sylvia Chang stars as a suicidal landlady who rents an apartment to three irritating young hipsters in this transcendent drama from Li Yu (“Lost in Beijing”) one of the only female directors working in China. Popular actress, Fan Bingbing (“Shaolin”), stars as one of the hipsters, but it’s Sylvia Chang, the most important woman in Chinese show business in the 70’s and 80’s, who owns this movie.

“Ocean Heaven”
(China/Hong Kong, 2010, New York Premiere, 96 minutes)
Directed by another female director, this movie sees Jet Li team up with cinematographer Christopher Doyle and composer Joe Hisaishi to make a restrained, heartbreaking movie about a dad (Jet Li) trying to teach his autistic son how to live on his own. Beautifully shot, scored, acted and observed, it’s got no action, all heartbreak.

“Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame”
(Hong Kong, 2010, 122 minutes) – Wu Xia Focus
Tsui Hark’s return to greatness is a Holmes-ian fantasia about spontaneous combustion and kung fu deer. An exiled detective is returned to favor in the Imperial court to solve a series of mysterious deaths that delay the inauguration of the Empress Wu, played by Carina Lau, who won “Best Actress” at the Hong Kong Film Awards 2011 for her performance. The movie also won top prizes in Art Direction, Costume and Make-up Design as well as in Sound Design and Visual Effects.

“Dragon Inn”
(Hong Kong, 1992, 109 minutes) – Wu Xia Focus
Two of Hong Kong’s greatest actresses, Maggie Cheung and Brigitte Lin, take on Donnie Yen’s bloodless eunuch in this Tsui Hark-produced swordplay romance. Directed by Raymond Lee, it’s a remake of King Hu’s 1967 masterpiece. A brand new print of this classic film, struck specially for the New York Asian Film Festival.

“Duel to the Death”
(Hong Kong, 1983, 83 minutes) – Wu Xia Focus
Ching Siu-tung’s directorial debut deploys ninjas, poisoned blades and some of the world’s most innovative choreography to create a movie that’s one part martial arts film, one part exploitation shocker and one part ballet. Screening on a rare 35mm print!

Punished”
(Hong Kong, 2011, International Premiere, 94 minutes)
The latest movie produced by Johnnie To, this is a hardcore revenge drama featuring a powerhouse turn by Anthony Wong as a real estate billonaire whose wild child daughter has been kidnapped. Bullet-to-the-head action the way Hong Kong used to do it.

“Shaolin”
(Hong Kong/China, 2011, North American Premiere, 131 minutes) – Centerpiece Presentation
It doesn’t get any bigger than this. Superstar Andy Lau, Nic Tse and Jackie Chan all star in this swank, blockbuster retelling of the primal martial arts story: the destruction of Shaolin Temple, which is the birthplace of martial arts. It’s a movie that’s been made many times (hence the alternate title “New Shaolin Tample”) but never before has it been this massive, this lavish and this chock full o’action.

“Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky”
(Hong Kong, 1991, 91 minutes)
The classic Hong Kong midnight action movie about prison privatization and monsters who strangle you with their guts. Rarely seen on the big screen, this is a full-on, ridiculously crazy mind-melter full of crucifixion, flaying, classic kung fu combat and prison wardens who keep breath mints in their glass eyeballs.

“Zu: Warriors From the Magic Mountain”
(Hong Kong, 1983 94 minutes) – Wu Xia Focus
The movie that launched a thousand wu xia, Tsui Hark’s surreal phantasmagoria will blow your mind. Recruiting Hollywood special effects technicians just off “Star Wars” and “Star Trek: The Motion Picture,” Tsui Hark’s film reinvented a genre and kickstarted Hong Kong’s entire special effects industry. This is a rare chance to see a 35mm print of this movie in all its big screen glory.

JAPAN
“13 Assassins: Director’s Cut”
(Japan, 2010, 141 minutes, New York Premiere)
The complete UNCUT version of Takashi Miike’s samurai masterpiece. With 17 minutes of original footage restored.

“Abraxas”
(Japan, 2010, New York Premiere, 113 minutes)
Straight outta Sundance comes this movie about a punk rocker turned Buddhist monk who still yearns to rock out.

“Battle Royale”
(Japan, 2000, 114 minutes)
A celebratory screening of Kinji Fukasaku’s masterpiece now that it finally – after 10 years!!!! – has a new distributor who wants people to actually see it.

“A Boy and His Samurai”
(Japan, 2010, North American Premiere, 109 minutes)
The director of “Fish Story” and “Golden Slumber” returns to the festival with this family film about a samurai who winds up in the modern era. Surprisingly, it then becomes an exceptional food movie! This is the father-son movie you’ve been looking for.

“Dark on Dark”
(Japan, 2011, International Premiere, 17 minutes)
This short film is the directorial debut from Makoto Ohtake, a well-known Japanese comedian and actor since the 80’s (he’s worked extensively with Takeshi Kitano and the popular City Boys troupe). It’s all about a two-bit talent manager and his outrageously endowed adult video talent bringing peace into the world via their various “gifts.” Screens with “Horny House of Horror.”

“Gantz” and “Gantz: Perfect Answer”
(Japan, 2011, 130 minutes & 150 minutes)
Presented back-to-back it’s the uncut, subtitled, live action movies based on Japan’s existential sci fi action manga. It’s the New York Premiere of the subtitled “Gantz” and the North American Premiere of the subtitled “Gantz: Perfect Answer.”

“Heavens Story”
(Japan, 2010, North American Premiere, 278 minutes)
“King of Pink Films” Takahisa Zeze spent almost two years shooting this 4 hour movie about two random murders and the heartbreak, trauma and healing that spills out from them over the next two decades. Monumental and strange, passionate and philosophical, this is an epic in every sense of the word and a towering achievement in film.

“Horny House of Horror”
(Japan, 2010, North American Premiere, 75 minutes)
Japan does the violent porno horror thing better than anyone else and this oddity features butt-walls, wiener-eating and demon hookers. This is the directorial debut from the writer of “Mutant Girls Squad,” and it’s firmly in the vein of that film and “Robo Geisha.” Only, you know, set in a horny house that’s full of horror.

“Karate-Robo Zaborgar”
(Japan, 2011, New York Premiere, 106 minutes)
Noboru Iguchi (“Robo Geisha”) makes his best film yet. Not just that, but this is the best-looking flick from label, Sushi Typhoon, yet. Slick, big budget and almost family friendly, it’s based on an obscure TV show from the 70’s about a young, bright-eyed police officer and his karate robot (who transforms into a motorcycle) fighting crime. But in Iguchi’s version, the two split up and have to reunite years later after middle-age has taken its toll.

“The Last Days of the World”
(Japan, 2011, World Premiere, 96 minutes)
A return to the trippy, socially-engaged, blackly comic, ridiculously violent revolutionary movies of Japan’s 60’s. A high school student has a vision that the world is ending and so, faced with no consequences, he abducts a fellow student and goes on a crime spree.

“Love and Loathing and Lulu and Ayano”
(Japan, 2010, North American Premiere, 105 minutes)
Based on a book of interviews with porn film dayworkers, this exuberant, anime-influenced movie about life on the bottom rungs of the adult film business treats life in the porno business as a chance for some actors to escape their humdrum, everyday existences.

“Milocrorze: A Love Story”
(Japan, 2011, North American Premiere, 90 minutes) – Opening Night Movie
Truly trippy, this bizarro musical/variety/samurai/love story from Japan is one solid slab of psychedelia from Yoshimasa Ishibashi, the mad genius behind the Fuccon Family.

“Ninja Kids!!!”
(Japan, 2011, World Premiere, 100 minutes) – Centerpiece Presentation
Takashi Miike has been impressing critics with “13 Assassins” and his 3D remake of “Hara Kiri” that just played Cannes. Whatever. We’ve got the World Premiere of his insane new kid’s flick about feuding ninja schools. People wonder where all the craziness went from Miike’s two new films? He put it all in here. Your jaw will drop like an elevator with a snapped cable. We love you, Takashi Miike!!!

“Osamu Tezuka’s Buddha: The Great Departure”
(Japan, 2011, North American Premiere, 111 minutes)
The much-anticipated animated epic based on Osamu Tezuka’s landmark life of the Buddha.

“Ringing in Their Ears”
(Japan, 2011, International Premiere, 89 minutes)
Yu Irie (“8000 Miles”) returns with this ambitious flick about an upcoming concert by a reclusive rock group and the managers, obsessed fans, shut-ins, single moms and kindergarten teachers who are affected by it. A true tribute to the healing power of rock and roll.

“Versus”
(Japan, 2000, 120 minutes)
A tenth-anniversary celebration of the Japanese zombie action film that launched a thousand horror/splatter/action flicks.

“Yakuza Weapon”
(Japan, 2011, New York Premiere, 105 minutes)
Stuntman-turned-director, Tak Sakaguchi, turns in a high calibre, action-heavy riff on Robocop all about a robot yakuza out to put his fist through the skulls of the bad guys. From Sushi Typhoon, purveyor of movies like “Vampire Girl vs Frankenstein Girl.”

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