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SXSW Hit “Attack the Block” Gets U.S. Distribution

SXSW Hit “Attack the Block” Gets U.S. Distribution (photo)

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It came a few weeks after the festival, but one of South By Southwest 2011’s biggest hits — it won the Audience Award for the ‘Midnighters’ sidebar — has been acquired for U.S. distribution. “Attack the Block” from director Joe Cornish has been acquired by Screen Gems, according to a press release:

“Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions (SPWA) announced today that it has acquired U.S. rights to ‘Attack the Block’ written and directed by Joe Cornish. Screen Gems will distribute the highly regarded film which won the Midnight Feature Audience Award at this year’s South By Southwest Film Festival. The announcement was made today by SPWA President Steve Bersch and Screen Gems’ President Clint Culpepper.”

No word as of yet on when we can expect a US release; though the announcement does mention that if you’re in the UK, you’ll be able to see it come May 11. The announcement coincides with what sounded like the glitziest screening the movie has or will ever had last night in Los Angeles. Afterwards, directors like Eli Roth and Richard Kelly, and actors like Joel McHale and Adam Scott all tweeted their love for the film. You can also read my enthusiastic review on IFC.com; here’s a little sample:

“It feels a little strange to call a movie about bloodthirsty gorilla-wolf aliens authentic, but that’s exactly what ‘Attack the Block’ is. From the characters to their conversations to their home to their reactions to those aliens, everything about the movie feels real to life. Though ‘Block’ has its share of crazy cool moments, these kids aren’t super-heroes. They don’t have artfully choreographed wire-fu moves or big shiny handguns to fire whilst leaping through the air and screaming. The kids of the Block (who, I suddenly realize, could really use their own gang name) might not realize it at first, but they are sorely out of their league, and their actions have intense unforeseen consequences. Because Cornish grounds the film so believably in this world and these characters, we personally feel every single one.”

I’m looking forward to seeing the movie again whenever it hits U.S. theaters.

Carol Cate Blanchett

Spirit Guide

Check Out the Spirit Awards Nominees for Best Male and Female Leads

Catch the 2016 Spirit Awards live Feb. 27th at 5P ET/2P PT on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Wilson Webb/©Weinstein Company/Courtesy Everett Collection

From Jason Segel’s somber character study of author David Foster Wallace, to Brie Larson’s devastating portrayal of a mother in captivity, the 2016 Spirit Awards nominees for Best Male and Female Leads represent the finest in the year of film acting. Take a look at the Best Male and Female Leads in action, presented by Jaguar.

Best Male Lead 

Christopher Abbott, James White
Abraham Attah, Beasts of No Nation
Ben Mendelsohn, Mississippi Grind
Jason Segel, The End of the Tour
Koudous Seihon, Mediterranea

Watch more Male Lead nominee videos here.

Best Female Lead 

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Rooney Mara, Carol
Bel Powley, The Diary of A Teenage Girl
Kitana Kiki Rodriguez, Tangerine

Watch more Female Lead nominee videos here.

Conan O’Brien Really “Can’t Stop” Rodman Flender

Conan O’Brien Really “Can’t Stop” Rodman Flender (photo)

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As the line that stretched well around the Paramount Theater in Austin finally filed into to see “Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop,” attendees were asked to pull out a photo ID in addition to their badges, perhaps out of fear former NBC chief Jeff Zucker might want to sneak a glimpse of what very easily could’ve been one last parting shot over the late night fiasco that left “The Tonight Show” tarnished and O’Brien without a desk job. Ultimately, Zucker’s name isn’t mentioned once in the documentary, but O’Brien’s legion of fans is ever present just as the history books will likely reflect, especially since director Rodman Flender was there to capture the 32-city tour that bridged O’Brien’s unceremonious departure from NBC to eventually finding a home at TBS.

One of those rare portraits of an artist that’s as entertaining as it is insightful, “Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop” could hardly have been made by anyone else than Flender, a college pal of O’Brien’s at Harvard who since went on to make darkly-tinged comedies such as “Idle Hands” before finding a steady career in television where the breakneck pace of production surely helped him keep up with the fleet feet of O’Brien once they hit the road on the “Legally Prohibited From Being Funny On Television” tour. However, it was Flender’s friendship with O’Brien that got him in the door for what O’Brien joked at SXSW “a record that patients around the world could use,” detailing the painful days of putting “The Tonight Show” to rest and coming up with a live variety show from scratch within weeks.

03242011_RodmanFlenderConanOBrienCantStop.jpgA stoic O’Brien is able to toss off one-liners like “I didn’t want to be the first to take ‘The Tonight Show’ into the next day,” but it’s quickly apparent Flender’s lens is going to catch some of the very real frustration behind the scenes of creating something while the entire world’s watching, greeting an endless parade of fans and dealing with the fallout of not getting a fair shake. As O’Brien says during a particularly brutal stint at Bonnaroo, “Nobody’s thinking of burning me out,” which while feeling true at the time runs counter to the other fascinating aspect of “Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop” — the real Team Coco that props O’Brien up during this marathon run including his longtime executive producer Jeff Ross and his assistant Sona Movsesian (who steals the film as an able foil for her boss’s quips), among others. Add in special guests such as Eddie Vedder, Jim Carrey, Jack White, and a dressed down Jack McBrayer, not to mention variants on O’Brien’s usual carousel of characters like the self-pleasuring panda, and you’ve got an incredibly good time that just happens to be an remarkable time capsule as well.

While at SXSW, O’Brien stopped by the IFC Crossroads House to talk about the film during the festival and I got a chance to catch up with the film’s director following the film’s debut in Austin.

At what point did you find out about Conan leaving NBC?

I found out like everybody else. There were rumors swirling around and I heard those rumors and it all happened very quickly — for Conan as well. It all happened, as you see in the movie, in a very short space of time.

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“Undefeated,” Reviewed

“Undefeated,” Reviewed (photo)

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Coach Bill Courtney calls his Manassas Tigers a second-half team. It’s an accurate description for many reasons beyond the football squad’s trouble scoring early in the game, but one that specifically applies to the film made about them by Dan Lindsay and TJ Martin for it is in the second half that “Undefeated” transcends the traditional sports doc.

Of course, documentaries always require a bit of luck no matter how skilled the filmmakers are and in the case of “Undefeated,” it’s actually the bad luck of Montrail “Money” Brown, an undersized right tackle who suffers a torn ACL midway through his senior season, which sets off a series of alternately heartbreaking and inspiring moments during a year of football no one could’ve expected.

Ironically, it’s expectations that held me back from immediately embracing “Undefeated” as something special. In reports that the film had been sold at SXSW to the Weinstein Company, a common refrain was a comparison to “The Blind Side” due to one of its storylines and it bears a strong resemblance to “Friday Night Lights” in its aesthetic and, to some degree, its structure before the exceptionally compelling story of the lower-class North Memphis squad takes over.

Lindsay and Martin’s film is full of the extreme close-ups and impressionistic editing that Peter Berg employed for the gritty style that has become code in contemporary cinematic terms for any sports film these days being about “more than just a game,” which poses the intriguing if problematic conceit in a documentary that faux reality has replaced the actual thing in order to be engaging. However, “Undefeated” has no shortcomings in the charm department thanks to the other way the film is like “Lights,” as it’s told primarily from the perspective of its coach, Courtney, the owner of a hardwood lumber company who volunteers at a local high school because football is his true passion.

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