DID YOU READ

Seven Rare Films To Watch Now Before Google Video Dies

Seven Rare Films To Watch Now Before Google Video Dies  (photo)

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This post will self-destruct in two weeks…well, not exactly, but the videos below will be since Google unceremoniously announced the end of Google Video over the weekend that they are putting a kibosh on the video service as of April 29th that unlike the one they eventually bought, YouTube, allowed users to upload video longer than 10 minutes. This development won’t be mourned by many, as the video quality was never that great and since 2009, users lost the ability to upload videos, so it became something of a barren wasteland in terms of content.

However, unrestricted by time and largely ungoverned, the site also became the place on the Internet where cinema’s orphans could be widely seen, either because they now belong to the public domain or because issues legal or otherwise have prevented their release through traditional means. Naturally, this meant there was plenty of piracy on the site of more recent films, much of which was eventually cleaned up, but for cinephiles, it also offered easy access to films that were mostly exclusive to the bootleg market, including a lot of early films that add context to some famous filmmakers’ later oeuvres or obscurities that must be seen to be believed. Here is a sampling:

“Fear and Desire”

Last year, there was word that a DVD edition of Stanley Kubrick’s first feature film may finally become available in the near future after Eastman House uncovered a print in a Puerto Rican film lab they inherited, but the late director long tried his best to keep the film out of circulation, which is why this online version is the closest most cinephiles have ever gotten to see the film, featuring future writer/director Paul Mazursky as one of four soldiers who must fend for themselves in an unidentified country after their plane crashes in enemy territory. After Kubrick raised the film’s $10,000 budget on his own, he sold the rights to foreign film distributor Joseph Burstyn, who subsequently went out of business, leaving “Fear and Desire”‘s rights in limbo and public screenings have been rare ever since.

“American Boy”

The last time this 1978 documentary from Martin Scorsese was widely available, it was still mostly for collectors as part of a laserdisc set The Voyager Company (of which the Criterion Collection descended) released of the director’s early nonfiction shorts in 1990. As Dave Kehr wrote for that disc’s liner notes, the film’s subject Steven Prince bears a resemblance to “The King of Comedy”‘s Rupert Pupkin as a storyteller in search of an audience, though Prince is genuinely captivating as he simply tells tales from his growing up, and the film is insightful not only in terms of Scorsese’s style (full of closeups) taking shape, but into the influences that shaped him as it’s clear Prince is a close friend. (It’s also obvious the film had an impact on Quentin Tarantino since one of the anecdotes is the basis for one of “Pulp Fiction”‘s most famous scenes.) If you find the time, after you see “American Boy,” you should do yourself a favor and watch Tommy Pallotta’s wonderful follow-up doc “American Prince” – also available for free online — which catches up with Prince in the present day when he’s as compelling as ever.

“HWY: An American Pastoral”

This experimental film starring Jim Morrison got a resurrection last year when Tom DiCillo dug it up to serve as the backbone for his documentary on The Doors, “When You’re Strange,” which had the surreal effect of bringing the late singer back to life since so few people had seen the original film and the image of a bearded Morrison coasting through the desert and ultimately ending up in Los Angeles is eerie to say the least, though it ultimately owed far more to the influences of Michelangelo Antonioni than it does the singer’s personal journey. As DiCillo told me during an interview last year, “There’s no way in hell we could’ve recreated that” and indeed, the clips in “When You’re Strange” get the best presentation the film has ever received, yet the film is currently only available in full online.

“Begotten”

No less than Susan Sontag labeled future “Shadow of the Vampire” director E. Elias Merhige’s highly experimental 1991 horror film “one of the 10 most important films ever made,” which surprised the writer/director since as he told Filmmaker magazine years later, “I had people telling me I’d be lucky if I could ever show the film for free.” Ultimately, that’s how it worked out since short of paying upwards of $60 on eBay for an out-of-print self-distributed DVD of the film, the version online is the only way to see this dialogue-free, black-and-white variation on the story of Genesis that’s extraordinary for what Merhige was able to do with the processing of the film for a surreal visual effect.

“Society of the Spectacle”

SnagFilms has cornered the market on delivering free documentaries to the public online, but Guy Debord’s 1973 adaptation of his own philosophical book about how society has been shaped by media and constant modernization, as told through a collage of film clips and other archival materials, is appropriately available on one of the widest platforms available.

“Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story”

Short of a secret screening at SXSW in 2009 where the title had to be kept under wraps, Todd Haynes’ 1988 biography of the famed singer told only with Barbie dolls is rarely shown in public as a result of rights issues from the music, which Richard Carpenter used to keep the film from ever being widely distributed. Yet the film remains beloved by cinephiles as it demonstrates the empathetic and articulate filmmaker that would go on to make “Far From Heaven” and “I’m Not There.”

“The Conqueror”

Frankly, words can’t do much justice to this 1956 disaster that starred John Wayne as Genghis Khan and Susan Hayward as the Asian princess Khan attempts to romance. Sadly, it wasn’t just a bomb by movie standards, but was believed to have been responsible for cancer in many of the film’s cast and crew since the film was shot near an atomic testing range in Nevada. All these things led producer Howard Hughes to buy back the film’s rights to keep it out of the public eye, though Universal eventually released the film on VHS in 1992. Still, “The Conqueror” hasn’t been re-released since, leaving this version the only way to see Wayne don a mustache that droops below his lips. As commenter Derek Hill mentions below, “The Conqueror” did make its way to DVD in 2006 as part of the “John Wayne: An American Icon Collection” series.

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SAG Life

Rappers Act Up

Watch the Yo! IFC Acts Movie Marathon Memorial Day Weekend.

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Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Everett Collection (and the '90s)

Memorial Day weekend: how to celebrate? Nothing quite says “screw spring—let’s do summer” like blockbuster movies starring rappers who ditched lucrative music careers in order to become actors. It happened a lot, remember? Especially in and around the ’90s. Will Smith, Eminem, Ice Cube, Ice-T, Marky Mark Wahlberg, Ludacris…icons with the hubris to try the silver screen instead and have it totally work out.

But what if more rappers had made the leap? That’s a rhetorical question—movies (and life) would’ve been better, obviously. To prove it, here are some movies that would’ve been more memorable with rappers.

The Godfather

Starring Biggie, not Brando.
Godfather-BIG

Charlie And The Chocolate Factory

Only Coolio could improve upon Gene Wilder’s performance.
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Billy Elliot

Billy Elliot, with a dose of Missy Elliott.
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Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves

Low hanging fruit, Hollywood.
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And of course…

Kanye-of-The-Lambs

See NONE of those movies and a whole bunch of real ones this Memorial Day weekend on IFC’s rapper-filled movie marathon.

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Brock Hard

Brockmire’s Guide To Grabbing Life By The D***

Catch up on the full season of Brockmire now.

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“Lucy, put supper on the stove, my dear, because this ballgame is over!”

Brockmire has officially closed out its rookie season. Miss the finale episode? A handful of episodes? The whole blessed season?? You can see it all from the beginning, starting right here.

And you should get started, because every minute you spend otherwise will be a minute spent not living your best life. That’s right, there are very important life lessons that Brockmire hid in plain sight—lessons that, when applied thoughtfully, can improve every aspect of your awesome existence. Let’s dive into some sage nuggets from what we call the Book of Jim.

Life Should Be Spiked, Not Watered Down.

That’s not just a fancy metaphor. As Brockmire points out, water tastes “awful. 70% of the water is made up of that shit?” Life is short, water sucks, live like you mean it.

There Are Only Three Types of People

“Poor people, rich people and famous people. Rich people are just poor people with money, so the only worthwhile thing is being famous.” So next time your rich friends act all high and mighty, politely remind them that they’re worthless in the eyes of even the most minor celebrities.

There’s Always A Reason To Get Out Of Bed

And 99% of the time that reason is the urge to pee. It’s nature’s way of saying “seize the day.”

There’s More To Life Than Playing Games

“Baseball can’t compete with p0rnography. Nothing can.” Nothing you do or ever will do can be more important to people than p0rn. Get off your high horse.

A Little Empathy Goes A Long Way

Especially if you’ve taken someone else’s Plan B by mistake.

Our Weaknesses Can Be Our Greatest Strengths

Tyrion Lannister said something similar. Hard to tell who said it with more colorful profanity. Wise sentiments all around.

Big Things Come To Those Who Wait

When you’re looking for a sign, the universe will drop you a big one. You’re the sh*t, universe.

And Of Course…

Need more life lessons from the Book of Jim? Catch up on Brockmire on the IFC App.

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Oh Mama

Mommie May I?

Mommie Dearest Is On Repeat All Mothers Day Long On IFC

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The cult-classic movie Mommie Dearest is a game-changer. If you’ve seen it even just once (but come on, who sees it just once?), then you already know what we’re talking about.

But if you haven’t seen it, then let us break it down for you. Really quick, we promise, we’ll even list things out to spare you the reading of a paragraph:

1. It’s the 1981 biopic based on the memoir of Christina Crawford, Hollywood icon Joan Crawford’s adopted daughter.
2. Faye Dunaway plays Joan. And boy does she play her. Loud and over-reactive.
3. It was intended as a drama, but…
4. Waaaaaay over-the-top performances and bargain-basement dialogue rendered it an accidental comedy.
5. It’s a cult classic, and you’re the last person to see it.

Not sold? Don’t believe it’s going to change your life? Ok, maybe over-the-top acting isn’t your thing, or perhaps you don’t like the lingering electricity of a good primal scream, or Joan Crawford is your personal icon and you can’t bear to see her cast in such a creepy light.

But none of that matters.

What’s important is that seeing this movie gives you permission to react to minor repeat annoyances with unrestrained histrionics.

That there is a key moment. Is she crazy? Yeah. But she’s also right. Shoulder nipples are horrible, wire hangers are the worst, and yelling about it feels strangely justified. She did it, we can do it. Precedent set. You’re welcome.

So what else can we yell about? Channel your inner Joan and consider the following list offenses when choosing your next meltdown.

Improperly Hung Toilet Paper

Misplaced Apostrophes

Coldplay at Karaoke

Dad Jokes

Gluten Free Pizza

James Franco

The list of potential pedestrian grievances is actually quite daunting, but when IFC airs Mommie Dearest non-stop for a full day, you’ll have 24 bonus hours to mull it over. 24 bonus hours to nail that lunatic shriek. 24 bonus hours to remember that, really, your mom is comparatively the best.

So please, celebrate Mother’s Day with Mommie Dearest on IFC and at IFC.com. And for the love of god—NO WIRE HANGERS EVER.

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