DID YOU READ

The Civil Wars Quietly Storm The IFC Crossroads House

The Civil Wars Quietly Storm The IFC Crossroads House (photo)

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At first glance, you would expect Joy Williams and John Paul White to be a source of stone cold severity. There doesn’t seem to be room for play in a duo that names themselves The Civil Wars — she, dressed in all black, lace up to her collarbone; he, in a staid gray suit, cinched with a gentleman’s bow tie. But the playfulness beneath the surface is what makes The Civil Wars’ often melancholy songs of love so resonant, and their live show, performed last night at the IFC Crossroads House, ultimately mesmerizing.

In the tradition of duos like June Carter and Johnny Cash, Williams and White have an on-stage rapport there that belies a certain degree of intimacy and comfort; though like another dark-haired, country-leaning duo of red and white sartorial splendor, no they are not married, and yes, they know you’re wondering. Williams and White use this intrigue to their dramatic advantage, teasing and taunting each other during their performances. She smooths his hair and straightens his collar. They throw their heads back in sync, holding notes longer than they should be held, shooting each other brazen, toothy smiles and side glances. There is a chemistry at work — a twinkle. It may not be love, but it’s close enough for the audience to get giddy off the high.

Williams hails from Northern California, and White from Alabama, but Nashville is where they came together, and their songs are born of the spare clarity of the country music town’s influence. The duo first gained recognition when the title track off their “Poison and Wine” EP soundtracked the final minutes of an episode of “Grey’s Anatomy,” but it is clear their songs are borne of the subtlety and splendor that catapults them beyond the realm of momentary TV soundtrack stardom. And though “Poison and Wine” is a particularly somber sampling of their sound, the duo is just as magnificent when they’re hip swinging and foot stomping, their vocals leaping after each other, as they do on the title track of their first full-length album, “Barton Hollow,” which was produced, along with their EP, by Grammy Award-winner, Charlie Peacock.

Both Williams and White wield wildly malleable voices that swing from brassy twang, to coy, breathy whisper, to bold bell-like clarity. Harmony is their entrée offering, but most interesting is how they put the meal together, beginning in glorious discord, and sliding their voices, vibratos mystifyingly synchronized, to harmonious resolution. To watch this kind of congruence manifest itself in front of you, over and over again, is as mind-blowing as watching a magician disappear a body from a hollow box. You just keep thinking, “How do they do it?”

Perhaps the most endearing songs in the hour-long set were their covers, which included a chilling version of The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Disarm,” and a slow, seductive interpretation of “Billie Jean,” Williams playing the seductress to White’s pleading narrator. Even when tackling other musicians’ material, The Civil Wars can read as somber, serious, pensive – but never without a bit of light shining through. Towards the close of the set, the duo also took on “You Are My Sunshine,” which, we all discovered, is one of the state songs of Louisiana. “The verses are actually quite sad,” Williams said of the tune with the sunny title. “Which fits us perfectly,” said White, matching his partner’s warning with its complementary humorous note, and encapsulating the harmony of this special pair.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

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It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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