DID YOU READ

“You Wont Miss Me,” Reviewed

“You Wont Miss Me,” Reviewed (photo)

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This review originally ran as part of our coverage of the 2009 Sundance Film Festival.

“You Wont Miss Me” is all about Shelly Brown, a girl with the kind of problems plenty of 20-somethings dream of moving to New York for the express purpose of having: substance abuse, reckless hookups in her bedraggled Williamsburg apartment with shaggy boys who mistreat her, sudden fights with friends and strangers, an unseen actress mother who doesn’t pay her enough attention, and no job beyond auditioning for roles herself. But the film, the second from director Ry Russo-Young, isn’t your average chronicle of dabblings in urban self-destruction, because Shelly, as she’s begun to realize herself, can’t turn down the volume. She’s not crazy — the film is structured around fractions of her exit interview with the psychiatrist tossing from a mental hospital because she doesn’t belong there — but she’s the kind of person who gets called that behind her back, her emotions and moods always slipping out of her control, her intense and frightening need for connection driving away whoever she reaches out to.

Poignantly, pitifully lonely and vulnerable, but also given to wearisome self-defeating bursts and bouts of self-pity, Shelly isn’t exactly lovable, and how much you become invested in her anyway will be the measure of how well you like the film, since she’s in every scene, sometimes providing voiceover musings during dreamlike dialog-free shots walking along the sidewalk or riding on the road. In episodic segments, chronology uncertain, Shelly picks up a photographer at a party, a boy in an elevator, a motorcyclist… somewhere. She convinces the best friend she’s in love with to spend the weekend with her at her mother’s house, though he unexpectedly brings along his new girlfriend; shoots a film someone she met in the hospital; heads to Atlantic City to see The Virgins, only to fail to hold the interest of the lead singer afterward and to lash out at her friend in frustration; auditions for two plays and a movie and in general acts out.

Shelly’s played by Stella Schnabel, daughter of Julian, in a fearsomely committed performance that’s at least partially based on improv — she’s given a cowriting credit. She’s too fierce-looking to be traditionally pretty, though there’s something enthralling about her unfiltered intensity — you understand why the talky director holding the last audition she attends would want to cast Shelly in his film, even as he expresses concerns about her ability to distinguish fiction from reality.

“Orphans,” Russo-Young’s first film, was grouped into mumblecore more because of its premiere at SXSW 2007, the Woodstock of the movement, and her role in Joe Swanberg’s “Hannah Takes the Stairs,” than any stylistic similarities. Swanberg, along with Aaron Katz, Greta Gerwig and other familiar faces from those films, appear in that last audition scene, with Katz as the director who wants to see everyone in motion in acting exercises. It’s awkwardly funny, though it also seems like a rebuke of the crippling self-consciousness, the niceness that’s the affliction of all mumblecore characters: Shelly’s far from self-conscious or safe. As he delves into this, the would-be filmmaker attracts Shelly’s wrath, and she escalates quickly, calling him pretentious and telling him she doesn’t want to be in his movie, while he maintains a bloodless calm and responds as if they’re still engaged in an even-keeled conversation. There are prices to pay in feeling too much, “You Wont Miss Me” assures, but there are also times when people really ought to scream.

“You Wont Miss Me” opens in New York on December 10th.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

via GIPHY

It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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