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The IFC News Podcast Archive

The IFC News Podcast Archive (photo)

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By far, the question we get most to our IFC News Podcast e-mail account and to our Twitter accounts is “How can I listen to older episodes of the podcasts?” Well good news podcasts fans; Christmas came a couple days late this year. While we’re still working to make all our podcasts available on iTunes, we’re pleased to present this complete archive page containing links to every single IFC News Podcast. That’s right: every single one. Even the early ones that are embarrassingly terrible that you should never listen to. (Seriously. Don’t do it.)

Still, if you’ve got 200+ hours at your disposal and you want to listen to the evolution of our podcast, now you can. And it has evolved. On our very first episode (a review of “Borat” from October 2006), we were barely capable of introducing ourselves (we also were pretty blatantly ripping off Filmspotting‘s review format). By episode #25 we started to get the hang of things, and even added rudimentary editing and sound clips. Right around episode #120 you’ll start to hear things begin to congeal into their current form, with our misdirecting introductions, feedback, and, shortly after that, The Keyword Game.

Clicking any link below will take you directly to the mp3 of that podcast. If you want to download a file to transfer it to an iPod, you can right-click and choose “Save File” on PC (or hold “Option” and click on Mac).

We’ll try to keep this page updated from now on. Enjoy all the podcasts (maybe not all of them) and thanks for listening.

The Complete IFC News Podcast Archive
(Last Updated: 02/01/2011)

#215: Our Desert Island Movies
#214: From the 2011 Sundance Film Festival
#213: Michel Gondry’s Film Party
#212: The State of Superhero Movies
#211: The Coen Brothers’ Gritty Cinema
#210: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 2
#209: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 1
#208: Rating the MPAA Ratings System
#207: Boxing Movies
#206: “Black Swan” and the Life of Ballet Dancers on Film
#205: Movies About Royalty
#204: The Ingredients of Good Food Movies
#203: Movies About Veterans
#202: Bringing a Podcast to a (Danny) Boyle
#201: Performing an Autopsy on the Corpus of Torture Porn
#200: Revisiting Our Cinematic Blindspots
#199: Remembering Arthur Penn
#198: Highlights from Fantastic Fest 2010 and the 2010 New York Film Festival
#197: Directors as Swoopers and Bashers
#196: Our Faithful Look at Infidelity Movies
#195: Movies About The Price of Stardom
#194: Catching Up on the Best of 2010 on DVD
#193: Dinner Party Movies
#192: Fall 2010 Trailers
#191: Video Game Logic in Movies
#190: Speaking Out About Voice-over Narration
#189: Movie Dads, Good and Bed
#188: Following the Prestigious Mementos of Christopher Nolan’s Career
#187: The Dog-Eat-Dog World of Office Movies
#186: Airbrushing, Special Effects, and Beauty Onscreen
#185: Dysfunctional Family Movies
#184: Our Pixar Podcast
#183: All About Antiheroes
#182: Against Conventional Wisdom
#181: Urban Legends In (And Of) the Movies
#180: Great Physical Comedians
#179: Ranking the “Saturday Night Live” Movies
#178: Movies’ Representation of Fans
#177: Midlife Crisis Movies
#176: The Value of Shock Cinema
#175: How the West Was Revised
#174: Banksy and Directorial Agendas In Documentary Filmmaking
#173: Our Favorite Up and Coming Actors
#172: Kevin Smith’s Critical Dogma
#171: The Rules of Movie Time Travel
#170: From South by Southwest 2010
#169: Movie Mommies
#168: The Great 2010 Oscar Queso Challenge
#167: The Perils of Personal Filmmaking
#166: “Notstalgia”
#165: Ensemble Films
#164: John Travolta, Ham Sandwich
#163: From the 2010 Sundance Film Festival
#162: How Sundance Works
#161: Siege Films
#160: Evil Twins, Doubles, and Doppelgangers
#159: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 2
#158: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 1
#157: Stars’ Fading Power
#156: Our Guilty Pleasures of the Naughts
#155: Asian and Asian-American Actors in Hollywood
#154: The John Wooniverse
#153: The Pleasures of Stop Motion Animation
#152: Submitted For Your Approval, A “Twilight Zone” Podcast
#151: Supporting Characters Worthy of Spinoffs
#150: Biopics And “Improving” On Real Life
#149: “Melancholgia”
#148: May/November Romances and Movie Cougars
#147: Girl Movies For Guys, Guy Movies For Girls
#146: Clive Owen
#145: Whistleblower Movies
#144: Our Favorite Inhospitable Settings For Movies
#143: Do Spoilers Spoil Movie Discussions?
#142: Actual College, Meet College Movies
#141: Overused Soundtrack Choices
#140: Movie Aliens As Metaphors
#139: “Docsploitation”
#138: Yes, Comic-Con HAS Nuked the Fridge
#137: Psychiatrists and Therapists In Movies
#136: Scrambled Timelines
#135: Six Summer Movie Alternatives
#134: Action Movie Auteurs
#133: The Life of a “Female Filmmaker”
#132: Trying to High Concept the “High Concept”
#131: Great Modern Uses Of Black and White Photography
#130: Memory Loss In the Movies
#129: Sam Raimi Drags Us to Hell
#128: Cannes 2009: “Antichrist” and “Up”
#127: Theme Park Rides Based on Movies
#126: Screen Siblings
#125: Modern Day Retellings of Classic Literature
#124: Mental Disability On Screen
#123: Questionable Life Lessons From Formula Films
#122: Spring 2009 Trailers
#121: Cinematic Representations of The Devil
#120: Wrestlers Enter the Acting Ring
#119: From South by Southwest 2009
#118: The Bromantic Comedy
#117: The Importance of Accuracy in Adaptations
#116: Hyperlink Cinema
#115: Are Recessions Good For Movies?
#114: “Rapping” Up Joaquin Phoenix’s Career
#113: Traumatic Children’s Movies
#112: Analyzing the 2009 Oscar Nominations
#111: From the 2009 Sundance Film Festival
#110: Mall Movies (And Vikings?)
#109: The Sundance 2009 Preview
#108: Celebrating the Movies of 2008
#107: Our Favorite Performances of 2008
#106: Are Movies Getting Longer?
#105: Journalists On Screen
#104: Giving Thanks For the World of Indie Film
#103: Alison at the Wedding / Matt Getting Married
#102: James Bond
#101: Actors Playing Themselves, Sort Of

#100: “The Killer ______ Movie”
#99: Requiem For a Video Store
#98: Comebacks We’d Like to See
#97: Notable Big Screen Comebacks
#96: Soundtracks That Overshadow Their Movies
#95: Fantastic Fest 2008
#94: Non-Kids Movies Perfect For Kids
#93: Debating Two 2008 Toronto Film Festival Films: “Miracle at St. Anna” and “Happy-Go-Lucky”
#92: The Rules of Sad Assassins
#91: A Salute to Manny Farber and “Termite Actors”
#90: The 2008 (Indie) Fall Movie Preview
#89: Famously Disastrous Film Productions
#88: The Passion of the Passion Project
#87: Has Comic-Con Nuked the Fridge?
#86: Squandered Comedic Talent
#85: From Screen to Stage to Screen Again
#84: Is This the End of Indie Film?
#83: The Wide World of Drug Movies
#82: Taking On AFI’s Ten Top Tens
#81: On Child Actors
#80: Physical Disability on Film
#79: The Art of Online Video
#78: Cannes 2008 Endpoint
#77: Cannes 2008 Midpoint
#76: Raging (Uwe) Boll
#75: Not Another Teen Movie Podcast
#74: The 2008 (Indie) Summer Movie Preview
#73: Real Time Movies
#72: Senior Citizens on the Silver Screen
#71: Gambling in the Movies
#70: Remembering Anthony Minghella
#69: The Brothers Wilson
#68: South by Southwest 2008
#67: “The ’50s” in Recent Cinema
#66: New York City’s Outer Boroughs On Screen
#65: ’80s Nostalgia
#64: The Science of Chemistry
#63: The World of Super Bowl Advertising
#62: Oscar 2008 Snubs and Surprises
#61: The Movies of Sundance 2008
#60: “The Sundance Film”
#59: On Selling Out
#58: Looking Ahead to 2008
#57: Looking Back at 2007
#56: Daddy’s Little Directors
#55: Concerning Costume Dramas
#54: Confessing Some Cinematic Blindspots
#53: Screenwriters on Screen
#52: Motion-Capture and the Changing Face of Animation
#51: Television, the Emerging Medium
#50: Ridley Scott, King of the Director’s Cut
#49: Cinematic Sophomore Slumps
#48: Vampires Through the Ages
#47: An Appreciation of Mark Wahlberg
#46: “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” and Phillip Seymour Hoffman
#45: Video Game Adaptations
#44: “Eastern Promises”
#43: The Indie Musical
#42: The 2007 Fall Movie Preview
#41: The Actor-Director
#40: Vacation Movies
#39: The Most Disturbing Sex Scenes of All Time
#38: When Singers Play Singers
#37: Movies Based on TV Shows
#36: Cerebral Science Fiction
#35: Trailer Daze 2007
#34: The Crimes of Robin Williams
#33: Bruce WIllis, Movie Star
#32: Looking Back at the First Half of 2007
#31: If We Ran Movie Studios
#30: The Cure For the Summertime Movie Blues
#29: Reevaluating William Friedkin
#28: At the 2007 Cannes Film Festival
#27: Movies That Have Sat On the Shelf
#26: Foreign Directors Making Their English Language Debut
#25: Strange Spectator Sport Movies
#24: The 2007 Summer Movie Preview
#23: A Cop Movie Cliche Lineup
#22: An Interview With Henry Rollins
#21: “Grindhouse” and Grind Houses
#20: 3D and The Return of The Gimmick
#19: Do Critics Matter?
#18: Indulgent Reflections on Movie Theaters
#17: Horror Movie Tropes
#16: Award Season Wrap-Up
#15: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Winners
#14: The Life and Times of Nicolas Cage
#13: Looking Forward To Spring
#12: Our Sundance 2007 Wrap-Up
#11: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Nominees
#10: The Worst Films of 2006
#9: Awesomely Inappropriate Holiday Fare
#8: The Best Movies of 2006
#7: Movies of 2006 Too Good To Be Forgotten
#6: Deep Into “Inland Empire”
#5: “The Nativity Story”
#4: The Year of Kamikaze Auteurism
#3: The New Didactic Film
#2: Where Have All the Biopics Gone?
#1: On “Borat”

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Car Notes

Portlandia Keeps Road Rage In Park

Get a lesson in parking etiquette on a new Portlandia.

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It’s the most American form of cause and effect: Park like a monster, receive a passive-aggressive note.

car notes note

This unofficial rule of the road is critical to keeping the great big wheel of car-related Karma in balance. And naturally, Portlandia’s Kath and Dave have elevated it to an awkward, awkward art form in Car Notes, the Portlandia web series presented by Subaru.

If you’ve somehow missed the memo about Car Notes until now, you can catch up on every installment online, on the IFC app, and on demand. You can even have a little taste right here:

If your interest is piqued – great news for you! A special Car Notes sketch makes an appearance in the latest episode of Portlandia, and you can catch up on it now right here.

Watch all-new Portlandia Thursdays at 10P on IFC.

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Naked and Hungry

Two New Ways to Threeway

IFC's Comedy Crib gets sensual in time for Valentine's Day.

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This week, two scandalous new digital series debut on IFC’s Comedy Crib.
Ménage à Trois invites people to participate in a real-life couple’s fantasy boudoir. And The Filling is Mutual follows two saucy chefs who invite comedians to make food inspired by their routines. Each show crosses some major boundaries in sexy and/or delicious ways, and each are impossible to describe in detail without arousing some awkward physical cravings. Which is why it’s best to hear it directly from the minds behind the madness…

Ménage à Trois

According to Diana Kolsky and Murf Meyer, the two extremely versatile constants in the ever-shifting à trois, “MàT is a sensually psychedelic late night variety show exploring matters of hearts, parts and every goddamn thing in between…PS, any nudes will be 100% tasteful.”

This sexy brainchild includes sketches, music, and props that would put Pee-wee’s Playhouse to shame. But how could this fantastical new twist on the vanilla-sex variety show format have come to be?

“We met in a UCB improv class taught by Chris Gethard. It was clear that we both humped to the beat of our own drum; our souls and tongues intermingled at the bar after class, so we dove in head first.”

Sign me up, but promise to go slow. This tricycle is going to need training wheels.

The Filling is Mutual

Comedians Jen Saunderson and Jenny Zigrino became best friends after meeting in the restroom at the Gotham Comedy Club, which explains their super-comfortable dynamic when cooking with their favorite comedians. “We talk about comedy, sex, menses, the obnoxiousness of Christina Aguilera all while eating food that most would push off their New Year’s resolution.”

The hook of cooking food based off of comedy routines is so perfect and so personal. It made us wonder about what dishes Jen & Jenny would pair with some big name comedy staples, like…

Bill Murray?
“Oh, that’s easy Meatballs with Lingonberry Space Jam it’d be great, but then we’d have to Oh, that’s easy Meatballs with Lingonberry Space Jam it’d be great, but then we’d have to… Oh, that’s easy Meatballs with Lingonberry Space Jam it’d be great, but then we’d have to avoid doing any kind of silly Groundhog Day reference.” 

Bridget Everett?
“Cream Balls… Sea Salt encrusted Chocolate Ganache Covered Ice Cream Ball that melt cream when you bite into them.” 

Nick Kroll & John Mulaney? 
“I’d make George and Gil black and white cookies from scratch and just as we open the oven to put the cookie in we’d prank ’em with an obnoxious amount of tuna!!!”

Carrie Brownstein & Fred Armisen? 
“Definitely a raw cacao “safe word” brownie. Cacao!”

Just perfect.

See both new series in their entirety on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Dark Arts

Foot Fetish Jesus And Other Nightmares

Meet the minds behind Comedy Crib's latest series, Quirks and The Mirror.

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The Mirror and Quirks are really, really strange. Deeply disturbing yet hauntingly beautiful. But you really don’t need to read a synopsis of either of the aforementioned shows to understand the exact variety of nightmare-bonkers comedy these shows deliver — that’s why the good lord made links. Instead, take a peek behind the curtain and meet the creators.

Quirks

Let’s start with Kevin Tosi. Kevin does the whole show by himself. That doesn’t mean he’s a loner — Kevin has a day job with actual humans. But that day job is copywriting. So it’s only natural that his suppressed demons would manifest themselves in biting cartoon form, including “Foot Fetish Jesus”, in ways that somehow speak to all of us. If only all copywriters channeled their inner f*ckedupness into such…expressive art.

The Mirror

Onward to the folks at Wham City Comedy.

These guys aren’t your typical comedy collective in that their work is way more left-field and even elevated than your standard digital short. More funny weird than funny ha-ha. They’ve done collaborations with musicians like Beach House, Dan Deacon & Wye Oak, television networks (obviously), and others. Yeah they get paid, but their motivation feels deeper. Darker. Most of them are video artists, and that explains a lot.

See more of The Mirror and Quirks on IFC.com and the IFC app.

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