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The IFC News Podcast Archive

The IFC News Podcast Archive (photo)

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By far, the question we get most to our IFC News Podcast e-mail account and to our Twitter accounts is “How can I listen to older episodes of the podcasts?” Well good news podcasts fans; Christmas came a couple days late this year. While we’re still working to make all our podcasts available on iTunes, we’re pleased to present this complete archive page containing links to every single IFC News Podcast. That’s right: every single one. Even the early ones that are embarrassingly terrible that you should never listen to. (Seriously. Don’t do it.)

Still, if you’ve got 200+ hours at your disposal and you want to listen to the evolution of our podcast, now you can. And it has evolved. On our very first episode (a review of “Borat” from October 2006), we were barely capable of introducing ourselves (we also were pretty blatantly ripping off Filmspotting‘s review format). By episode #25 we started to get the hang of things, and even added rudimentary editing and sound clips. Right around episode #120 you’ll start to hear things begin to congeal into their current form, with our misdirecting introductions, feedback, and, shortly after that, The Keyword Game.

Clicking any link below will take you directly to the mp3 of that podcast. If you want to download a file to transfer it to an iPod, you can right-click and choose “Save File” on PC (or hold “Option” and click on Mac).

We’ll try to keep this page updated from now on. Enjoy all the podcasts (maybe not all of them) and thanks for listening.

The Complete IFC News Podcast Archive
(Last Updated: 02/01/2011)

#215: Our Desert Island Movies
#214: From the 2011 Sundance Film Festival
#213: Michel Gondry’s Film Party
#212: The State of Superhero Movies
#211: The Coen Brothers’ Gritty Cinema
#210: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 2
#209: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 1
#208: Rating the MPAA Ratings System
#207: Boxing Movies
#206: “Black Swan” and the Life of Ballet Dancers on Film
#205: Movies About Royalty
#204: The Ingredients of Good Food Movies
#203: Movies About Veterans
#202: Bringing a Podcast to a (Danny) Boyle
#201: Performing an Autopsy on the Corpus of Torture Porn
#200: Revisiting Our Cinematic Blindspots
#199: Remembering Arthur Penn
#198: Highlights from Fantastic Fest 2010 and the 2010 New York Film Festival
#197: Directors as Swoopers and Bashers
#196: Our Faithful Look at Infidelity Movies
#195: Movies About The Price of Stardom
#194: Catching Up on the Best of 2010 on DVD
#193: Dinner Party Movies
#192: Fall 2010 Trailers
#191: Video Game Logic in Movies
#190: Speaking Out About Voice-over Narration
#189: Movie Dads, Good and Bed
#188: Following the Prestigious Mementos of Christopher Nolan’s Career
#187: The Dog-Eat-Dog World of Office Movies
#186: Airbrushing, Special Effects, and Beauty Onscreen
#185: Dysfunctional Family Movies
#184: Our Pixar Podcast
#183: All About Antiheroes
#182: Against Conventional Wisdom
#181: Urban Legends In (And Of) the Movies
#180: Great Physical Comedians
#179: Ranking the “Saturday Night Live” Movies
#178: Movies’ Representation of Fans
#177: Midlife Crisis Movies
#176: The Value of Shock Cinema
#175: How the West Was Revised
#174: Banksy and Directorial Agendas In Documentary Filmmaking
#173: Our Favorite Up and Coming Actors
#172: Kevin Smith’s Critical Dogma
#171: The Rules of Movie Time Travel
#170: From South by Southwest 2010
#169: Movie Mommies
#168: The Great 2010 Oscar Queso Challenge
#167: The Perils of Personal Filmmaking
#166: “Notstalgia”
#165: Ensemble Films
#164: John Travolta, Ham Sandwich
#163: From the 2010 Sundance Film Festival
#162: How Sundance Works
#161: Siege Films
#160: Evil Twins, Doubles, and Doppelgangers
#159: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 2
#158: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 1
#157: Stars’ Fading Power
#156: Our Guilty Pleasures of the Naughts
#155: Asian and Asian-American Actors in Hollywood
#154: The John Wooniverse
#153: The Pleasures of Stop Motion Animation
#152: Submitted For Your Approval, A “Twilight Zone” Podcast
#151: Supporting Characters Worthy of Spinoffs
#150: Biopics And “Improving” On Real Life
#149: “Melancholgia”
#148: May/November Romances and Movie Cougars
#147: Girl Movies For Guys, Guy Movies For Girls
#146: Clive Owen
#145: Whistleblower Movies
#144: Our Favorite Inhospitable Settings For Movies
#143: Do Spoilers Spoil Movie Discussions?
#142: Actual College, Meet College Movies
#141: Overused Soundtrack Choices
#140: Movie Aliens As Metaphors
#139: “Docsploitation”
#138: Yes, Comic-Con HAS Nuked the Fridge
#137: Psychiatrists and Therapists In Movies
#136: Scrambled Timelines
#135: Six Summer Movie Alternatives
#134: Action Movie Auteurs
#133: The Life of a “Female Filmmaker”
#132: Trying to High Concept the “High Concept”
#131: Great Modern Uses Of Black and White Photography
#130: Memory Loss In the Movies
#129: Sam Raimi Drags Us to Hell
#128: Cannes 2009: “Antichrist” and “Up”
#127: Theme Park Rides Based on Movies
#126: Screen Siblings
#125: Modern Day Retellings of Classic Literature
#124: Mental Disability On Screen
#123: Questionable Life Lessons From Formula Films
#122: Spring 2009 Trailers
#121: Cinematic Representations of The Devil
#120: Wrestlers Enter the Acting Ring
#119: From South by Southwest 2009
#118: The Bromantic Comedy
#117: The Importance of Accuracy in Adaptations
#116: Hyperlink Cinema
#115: Are Recessions Good For Movies?
#114: “Rapping” Up Joaquin Phoenix’s Career
#113: Traumatic Children’s Movies
#112: Analyzing the 2009 Oscar Nominations
#111: From the 2009 Sundance Film Festival
#110: Mall Movies (And Vikings?)
#109: The Sundance 2009 Preview
#108: Celebrating the Movies of 2008
#107: Our Favorite Performances of 2008
#106: Are Movies Getting Longer?
#105: Journalists On Screen
#104: Giving Thanks For the World of Indie Film
#103: Alison at the Wedding / Matt Getting Married
#102: James Bond
#101: Actors Playing Themselves, Sort Of

#100: “The Killer ______ Movie”
#99: Requiem For a Video Store
#98: Comebacks We’d Like to See
#97: Notable Big Screen Comebacks
#96: Soundtracks That Overshadow Their Movies
#95: Fantastic Fest 2008
#94: Non-Kids Movies Perfect For Kids
#93: Debating Two 2008 Toronto Film Festival Films: “Miracle at St. Anna” and “Happy-Go-Lucky”
#92: The Rules of Sad Assassins
#91: A Salute to Manny Farber and “Termite Actors”
#90: The 2008 (Indie) Fall Movie Preview
#89: Famously Disastrous Film Productions
#88: The Passion of the Passion Project
#87: Has Comic-Con Nuked the Fridge?
#86: Squandered Comedic Talent
#85: From Screen to Stage to Screen Again
#84: Is This the End of Indie Film?
#83: The Wide World of Drug Movies
#82: Taking On AFI’s Ten Top Tens
#81: On Child Actors
#80: Physical Disability on Film
#79: The Art of Online Video
#78: Cannes 2008 Endpoint
#77: Cannes 2008 Midpoint
#76: Raging (Uwe) Boll
#75: Not Another Teen Movie Podcast
#74: The 2008 (Indie) Summer Movie Preview
#73: Real Time Movies
#72: Senior Citizens on the Silver Screen
#71: Gambling in the Movies
#70: Remembering Anthony Minghella
#69: The Brothers Wilson
#68: South by Southwest 2008
#67: “The ’50s” in Recent Cinema
#66: New York City’s Outer Boroughs On Screen
#65: ’80s Nostalgia
#64: The Science of Chemistry
#63: The World of Super Bowl Advertising
#62: Oscar 2008 Snubs and Surprises
#61: The Movies of Sundance 2008
#60: “The Sundance Film”
#59: On Selling Out
#58: Looking Ahead to 2008
#57: Looking Back at 2007
#56: Daddy’s Little Directors
#55: Concerning Costume Dramas
#54: Confessing Some Cinematic Blindspots
#53: Screenwriters on Screen
#52: Motion-Capture and the Changing Face of Animation
#51: Television, the Emerging Medium
#50: Ridley Scott, King of the Director’s Cut
#49: Cinematic Sophomore Slumps
#48: Vampires Through the Ages
#47: An Appreciation of Mark Wahlberg
#46: “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” and Phillip Seymour Hoffman
#45: Video Game Adaptations
#44: “Eastern Promises”
#43: The Indie Musical
#42: The 2007 Fall Movie Preview
#41: The Actor-Director
#40: Vacation Movies
#39: The Most Disturbing Sex Scenes of All Time
#38: When Singers Play Singers
#37: Movies Based on TV Shows
#36: Cerebral Science Fiction
#35: Trailer Daze 2007
#34: The Crimes of Robin Williams
#33: Bruce WIllis, Movie Star
#32: Looking Back at the First Half of 2007
#31: If We Ran Movie Studios
#30: The Cure For the Summertime Movie Blues
#29: Reevaluating William Friedkin
#28: At the 2007 Cannes Film Festival
#27: Movies That Have Sat On the Shelf
#26: Foreign Directors Making Their English Language Debut
#25: Strange Spectator Sport Movies
#24: The 2007 Summer Movie Preview
#23: A Cop Movie Cliche Lineup
#22: An Interview With Henry Rollins
#21: “Grindhouse” and Grind Houses
#20: 3D and The Return of The Gimmick
#19: Do Critics Matter?
#18: Indulgent Reflections on Movie Theaters
#17: Horror Movie Tropes
#16: Award Season Wrap-Up
#15: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Winners
#14: The Life and Times of Nicolas Cage
#13: Looking Forward To Spring
#12: Our Sundance 2007 Wrap-Up
#11: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Nominees
#10: The Worst Films of 2006
#9: Awesomely Inappropriate Holiday Fare
#8: The Best Movies of 2006
#7: Movies of 2006 Too Good To Be Forgotten
#6: Deep Into “Inland Empire”
#5: “The Nativity Story”
#4: The Year of Kamikaze Auteurism
#3: The New Didactic Film
#2: Where Have All the Biopics Gone?
#1: On “Borat”

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Scarface Movie Al Pacino

Wanna Play?

Say Hello to Our Scarface Quiz

Play along with movie trivia during "Scarface" tonight at 8P on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Tony Montana is all about money, power and respect. And while we can’t promise you’ll get money or power by taking our Scarface quiz below, you will get respect if you get a perfect score. One out of three ain’t bad. Click below to take the quiz, and catch Scarface this month on IFC.

take-the-quiz-quotes-image

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Hank Azaria Commencement

Best Speech Ever

Hank Azaria’s Simpsons Advice For Grads, Questionable Shark Facts and More of This Week’s Funniest Videos

This week we're laughing at Hank's Tufts commencement speech, Jason Alexander's shark facts and more.

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Photo Credit: YouTube/Tufts University

We’ve made it! Memorial Day weekend! But before we can complain that it’s over too quickly, take a moment to bask in the pre-break lack of productivity and enjoy some lighthearted videos.

From Hank Azaria channeling Chief Wiggum and other Simpsons characters while talking to college grads to “Shark-spert” Jason Alexander sharing questionable shark facts, here are five funny things from this week you need to watch.

1. Kermit Informs Fozzie Bear That They’ve Been Canceled

It’s never easy to see someone receive bad news, much less a Muppet. But if anything, Kermit’s poise and acceptance during a time of crisis is impressive, admirable even. Fozzie Bear, on the other hand, reacts with greater similarity to how we would: with baseless anger and utter despair.


2. Jason Alexander Offers Shark “Fin Facts”

Memorial Day weekend means the start of beach season, aka Shark Feeding Season. As part of IFC’s Shark Half-A-Day Memorial Day marathon, “sharks-pert” Jason Alexander offers up some interesting “fin facts” about our sharp-toothed friends from the deep. You can also check out Jason’s beach tips, and catch the Jaws movies with more “fin facts” from Jason this Memorial Day on IFC.


3. Game of Thrones’ Emilia Clarke Confirms Dothraki Is a Real Language

With eyes still dewy from the climax of this past Sunday’s Game of Thrones (Hold the door!), the Mother of Dragons herself Emilia Clarke dropped by Late Night with Seth Meyers to throw the diehard fans a reason to smile: Yes, Dothraki is a real language. Watch Clarke discuss the phonetics and grammar involved with vying for Westeros rule.


4. Hank Azaria Gives Advice Through Simpsons Characters

Hank Azaria — star of The Simpsons, The Birdcage, and Brockmire, premiering in 2017 on IFC — gave the commencement speech at his alma mater Tufts University. In the hilarious speech, Azaria discusses how he got through college, recounts his early career struggles, and offers up life advice via fan favorite Simpsons characters like Chief Wiggum and Comic Book Guy.


5. X-Men: The Animated Series Gets Honest

Screen Junkies are back this week with another round of Honest Trailers. This entry focuses on the cartoon mutants that comprise X-Men: The Animated Series — an ultra-’90s Marvel property that predates the comic book adaptation boom of the 21st Century. But looking back at the decade of Rob Liefeld and Todd McFarlane, this video finds much to mock.

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Weird Al Comedy Bang Bang Season 5

Call Him Al

“Weird Al” Talks Comedy Bang! Bang!, His Upcoming Tour, Favorite Videos and More

Weird Al comes to Comedy Bang! Bang! starting June 3rd at 11P on IFC.

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With a career spanning five decades, “Weird Al” Yankovic has defined the song parody genre and become a beloved pop culture icon. Starting June 3rd, you’ll be able to catch him as the brand new Comedy Bang! Bang! bandleader Fridays at 11P on IFC.

We recently chatted with Al about joining Scott Aukerman on the new season, his upcoming tour, favorite CB!B! characters and his future dream projects. (Hint: it might involve actors spontaneously breaking into song.)

The Comedy Bang! Bang! bandleader gig seems like a natural fit for you. Did it take any time to get acclimated?

Weird Al: Yeah. It’s a slightly different skill set. The accordion is my main act, but I don’t use it on the show at all. It’s a keyboard setup. The actual setup is a little bit of a combination of what Reggie [Watts] had and [Kid] Cudi had. And a few extra things thrown in. So I’m trying to do my own version of what they brought to the show.

You’ve been on the Comedy Bang! Bang! podcast and the show many times. Do you have a favorite CB!B! character?

Weird Al: I’d probably have to say Doctor Time. Every time Scott wants me to do an evil character, he’s always got a bad English accent. [Laughs] Any time my character goes evil, he becomes sort of British.

Any favorite guests you’ve worked with?

Weird Al: Gosh, I love them all. Paul F. Tompkins is always fun. His Andrew Lloyd Webber character, Cake Boss, everything he does. And Andy Daly as well. They’re so versatile and so amazing at improv. That’s the one thing I was a little nervous about because I’ve never been super confident with my improv skills. But Comedy Bang! Bang!, particularly the TV version, is good for that because it’s all heavily edited. So it kind of gives me permission to try out whatever comes to my mind, so if it really sucks, they’re not gonna use it. [Laughs]

Scott Aukerman Weird Al

Your upcoming tour is a continuation of your Mandatory Fun tour from last year. Any new elements to the show?

Weird Al: Well, it is the same tour, so it’s not that much different. I might freshen some video a little bit. I’m hoping to use a bit or two from the current season of Comedy Bang! Bang! and slip that into the show somewhere.

The tour starts June 3rd in St. Petersburg, Florida and ends September 24th at Radio City Music Hall. How do you keep up the pace? 

Weird Al: It’s just a mindset. I’m really only working for two hours a day, so I basically just save up my energy for the show. I relax, surf online, watch satellite TV, read a book, rest my voice, and then give it all I got when I’m onstage.

Looking back at your vast song catalog, was there ever a parody that came to you immediately upon hearing the song?

Weird Al: Yeah, that’s happened a few times. More often than not, I have to think about it and analytically work out all the variations on a theme that I can and pick out the one with the most potential. But there’s been a few times where the idea came to me spontaneously. I think the first time I saw Michael Jackson’s “Bad” video, before it was even over, I thought, “Oh! I gotta do ‘Fat’! Super-plus-sized actors trying to get through a turnstile on a subway! I gotta do that!”

Do you have a favorite of your many hilarious videos?

Weird Al: Oh boy, it’s hard to say. “White and Nerdy” has been my biggest hit and that was a really fun video to do. But in terms of making a video, “Tacky” was really fun to do because it was so easy and I got to work with amazing people like Jack Black, Margaret Cho, Kristen Schaal, Eric Stonestreet, and Aisha Tyler. And we knocked it out in a couple of hours. We were having so much fun while making it, I kinda wish we weren’t so efficient and professional. [Laughs] I could’ve done that all night.

Was it filmed all in one take or was it stitched together?

Weird Al: That was all one take. Some people say, “Oh, I see where the edit is,” but it was all one shot. We did a total of six takes, and I think four of those takes were usable, but the last one was the best.

And you were directing while performing?

Weird Al: I directed that one, yeah. We location scouted and found a building in downtown LA that I thought was good for the shoot. I’ve since seen that building in a lot of other movies and TV shows — I think it was used in The Big Lebowski and a few others. It was difficult because I start the video in one set of clothes and I also end the video in a completely different set of clothes. So while the cameras were off me, because there’s only one elevator in the building, I had to run down five flights of stairs, quickly change my clothes, and hit my mark for the end. And after the take, we’d all just watch what we did, and say, “OK, let’s do it again.”

Is there a director you’d love to work with in the future?

Weird Al: Oh gosh, yeah, but I mean, music videos are notoriously low-budget so that’s why I end up directing them myself. [Laughs] But I’d love to be in a movie codirected by Steven Spielberg and Quentin Tarantino.

Do you have a particular genre of music that you love parodying the most? Or is it more of the moment and different for each song?

Weird Al: It doesn’t necessarily revolve around personal taste so much. It really depends more on the song than the genre. But I found rap songs tend to lend themselves to parody, mostly because there’s a lot of words to play with. A lot of pop songs are repetitive, and that’s sometimes been an issue. With rap, there’s no shortage of syllables to mess around with.

Given that you’ve been so prolific and done so much, is there any type of art left that you’d like to dip your toe in? Dramatic acting, perhaps?

Weird Al: Well, if Spielberg and Tarantino want me for their film, I wouldn’t want to turn them down. But there’s no burning desire to do drama. I love doing comedy and feel comfortable doing that. Writing a musical might be something I do down the line. I don’t know when but I might take a shot at something in that area. Other than that, I’ve done pretty much all I wanted to do in my life so far. A lot of it not successfully. [Laughs] But I took a stab at it and feel gratified by that.

You’ve had such a eclectic career in music and comedy. What do you attribute your longevity to?

Weird Al: [Laughs] I don’t know what I’d attribute the longevity to. There’s a modicum of talent, but it’s mostly because I surround myself with very talented people. I’ve got a great support group, I’ve got the same band since the early ’80s, and I’ve worked with the same people for decades. And I got a very loyal fan base and I love what I do. And somehow I’ve been very lucky and it’s worked out so far.

Watch “Weird Al” in an episode from the new season of Comedy Bang! Bang! right now, before the season premiere on Friday June 3rd at 11P.

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