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The IFC News Podcast Archive

The IFC News Podcast Archive (photo)

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By far, the question we get most to our IFC News Podcast e-mail account and to our Twitter accounts is “How can I listen to older episodes of the podcasts?” Well good news podcasts fans; Christmas came a couple days late this year. While we’re still working to make all our podcasts available on iTunes, we’re pleased to present this complete archive page containing links to every single IFC News Podcast. That’s right: every single one. Even the early ones that are embarrassingly terrible that you should never listen to. (Seriously. Don’t do it.)

Still, if you’ve got 200+ hours at your disposal and you want to listen to the evolution of our podcast, now you can. And it has evolved. On our very first episode (a review of “Borat” from October 2006), we were barely capable of introducing ourselves (we also were pretty blatantly ripping off Filmspotting‘s review format). By episode #25 we started to get the hang of things, and even added rudimentary editing and sound clips. Right around episode #120 you’ll start to hear things begin to congeal into their current form, with our misdirecting introductions, feedback, and, shortly after that, The Keyword Game.

Clicking any link below will take you directly to the mp3 of that podcast. If you want to download a file to transfer it to an iPod, you can right-click and choose “Save File” on PC (or hold “Option” and click on Mac).

We’ll try to keep this page updated from now on. Enjoy all the podcasts (maybe not all of them) and thanks for listening.

The Complete IFC News Podcast Archive
(Last Updated: 02/01/2011)

#215: Our Desert Island Movies
#214: From the 2011 Sundance Film Festival
#213: Michel Gondry’s Film Party
#212: The State of Superhero Movies
#211: The Coen Brothers’ Gritty Cinema
#210: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 2
#209: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 1
#208: Rating the MPAA Ratings System
#207: Boxing Movies
#206: “Black Swan” and the Life of Ballet Dancers on Film
#205: Movies About Royalty
#204: The Ingredients of Good Food Movies
#203: Movies About Veterans
#202: Bringing a Podcast to a (Danny) Boyle
#201: Performing an Autopsy on the Corpus of Torture Porn
#200: Revisiting Our Cinematic Blindspots
#199: Remembering Arthur Penn
#198: Highlights from Fantastic Fest 2010 and the 2010 New York Film Festival
#197: Directors as Swoopers and Bashers
#196: Our Faithful Look at Infidelity Movies
#195: Movies About The Price of Stardom
#194: Catching Up on the Best of 2010 on DVD
#193: Dinner Party Movies
#192: Fall 2010 Trailers
#191: Video Game Logic in Movies
#190: Speaking Out About Voice-over Narration
#189: Movie Dads, Good and Bed
#188: Following the Prestigious Mementos of Christopher Nolan’s Career
#187: The Dog-Eat-Dog World of Office Movies
#186: Airbrushing, Special Effects, and Beauty Onscreen
#185: Dysfunctional Family Movies
#184: Our Pixar Podcast
#183: All About Antiheroes
#182: Against Conventional Wisdom
#181: Urban Legends In (And Of) the Movies
#180: Great Physical Comedians
#179: Ranking the “Saturday Night Live” Movies
#178: Movies’ Representation of Fans
#177: Midlife Crisis Movies
#176: The Value of Shock Cinema
#175: How the West Was Revised
#174: Banksy and Directorial Agendas In Documentary Filmmaking
#173: Our Favorite Up and Coming Actors
#172: Kevin Smith’s Critical Dogma
#171: The Rules of Movie Time Travel
#170: From South by Southwest 2010
#169: Movie Mommies
#168: The Great 2010 Oscar Queso Challenge
#167: The Perils of Personal Filmmaking
#166: “Notstalgia”
#165: Ensemble Films
#164: John Travolta, Ham Sandwich
#163: From the 2010 Sundance Film Festival
#162: How Sundance Works
#161: Siege Films
#160: Evil Twins, Doubles, and Doppelgangers
#159: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 2
#158: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 1
#157: Stars’ Fading Power
#156: Our Guilty Pleasures of the Naughts
#155: Asian and Asian-American Actors in Hollywood
#154: The John Wooniverse
#153: The Pleasures of Stop Motion Animation
#152: Submitted For Your Approval, A “Twilight Zone” Podcast
#151: Supporting Characters Worthy of Spinoffs
#150: Biopics And “Improving” On Real Life
#149: “Melancholgia”
#148: May/November Romances and Movie Cougars
#147: Girl Movies For Guys, Guy Movies For Girls
#146: Clive Owen
#145: Whistleblower Movies
#144: Our Favorite Inhospitable Settings For Movies
#143: Do Spoilers Spoil Movie Discussions?
#142: Actual College, Meet College Movies
#141: Overused Soundtrack Choices
#140: Movie Aliens As Metaphors
#139: “Docsploitation”
#138: Yes, Comic-Con HAS Nuked the Fridge
#137: Psychiatrists and Therapists In Movies
#136: Scrambled Timelines
#135: Six Summer Movie Alternatives
#134: Action Movie Auteurs
#133: The Life of a “Female Filmmaker”
#132: Trying to High Concept the “High Concept”
#131: Great Modern Uses Of Black and White Photography
#130: Memory Loss In the Movies
#129: Sam Raimi Drags Us to Hell
#128: Cannes 2009: “Antichrist” and “Up”
#127: Theme Park Rides Based on Movies
#126: Screen Siblings
#125: Modern Day Retellings of Classic Literature
#124: Mental Disability On Screen
#123: Questionable Life Lessons From Formula Films
#122: Spring 2009 Trailers
#121: Cinematic Representations of The Devil
#120: Wrestlers Enter the Acting Ring
#119: From South by Southwest 2009
#118: The Bromantic Comedy
#117: The Importance of Accuracy in Adaptations
#116: Hyperlink Cinema
#115: Are Recessions Good For Movies?
#114: “Rapping” Up Joaquin Phoenix’s Career
#113: Traumatic Children’s Movies
#112: Analyzing the 2009 Oscar Nominations
#111: From the 2009 Sundance Film Festival
#110: Mall Movies (And Vikings?)
#109: The Sundance 2009 Preview
#108: Celebrating the Movies of 2008
#107: Our Favorite Performances of 2008
#106: Are Movies Getting Longer?
#105: Journalists On Screen
#104: Giving Thanks For the World of Indie Film
#103: Alison at the Wedding / Matt Getting Married
#102: James Bond
#101: Actors Playing Themselves, Sort Of

#100: “The Killer ______ Movie”
#99: Requiem For a Video Store
#98: Comebacks We’d Like to See
#97: Notable Big Screen Comebacks
#96: Soundtracks That Overshadow Their Movies
#95: Fantastic Fest 2008
#94: Non-Kids Movies Perfect For Kids
#93: Debating Two 2008 Toronto Film Festival Films: “Miracle at St. Anna” and “Happy-Go-Lucky”
#92: The Rules of Sad Assassins
#91: A Salute to Manny Farber and “Termite Actors”
#90: The 2008 (Indie) Fall Movie Preview
#89: Famously Disastrous Film Productions
#88: The Passion of the Passion Project
#87: Has Comic-Con Nuked the Fridge?
#86: Squandered Comedic Talent
#85: From Screen to Stage to Screen Again
#84: Is This the End of Indie Film?
#83: The Wide World of Drug Movies
#82: Taking On AFI’s Ten Top Tens
#81: On Child Actors
#80: Physical Disability on Film
#79: The Art of Online Video
#78: Cannes 2008 Endpoint
#77: Cannes 2008 Midpoint
#76: Raging (Uwe) Boll
#75: Not Another Teen Movie Podcast
#74: The 2008 (Indie) Summer Movie Preview
#73: Real Time Movies
#72: Senior Citizens on the Silver Screen
#71: Gambling in the Movies
#70: Remembering Anthony Minghella
#69: The Brothers Wilson
#68: South by Southwest 2008
#67: “The ’50s” in Recent Cinema
#66: New York City’s Outer Boroughs On Screen
#65: ’80s Nostalgia
#64: The Science of Chemistry
#63: The World of Super Bowl Advertising
#62: Oscar 2008 Snubs and Surprises
#61: The Movies of Sundance 2008
#60: “The Sundance Film”
#59: On Selling Out
#58: Looking Ahead to 2008
#57: Looking Back at 2007
#56: Daddy’s Little Directors
#55: Concerning Costume Dramas
#54: Confessing Some Cinematic Blindspots
#53: Screenwriters on Screen
#52: Motion-Capture and the Changing Face of Animation
#51: Television, the Emerging Medium
#50: Ridley Scott, King of the Director’s Cut
#49: Cinematic Sophomore Slumps
#48: Vampires Through the Ages
#47: An Appreciation of Mark Wahlberg
#46: “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” and Phillip Seymour Hoffman
#45: Video Game Adaptations
#44: “Eastern Promises”
#43: The Indie Musical
#42: The 2007 Fall Movie Preview
#41: The Actor-Director
#40: Vacation Movies
#39: The Most Disturbing Sex Scenes of All Time
#38: When Singers Play Singers
#37: Movies Based on TV Shows
#36: Cerebral Science Fiction
#35: Trailer Daze 2007
#34: The Crimes of Robin Williams
#33: Bruce WIllis, Movie Star
#32: Looking Back at the First Half of 2007
#31: If We Ran Movie Studios
#30: The Cure For the Summertime Movie Blues
#29: Reevaluating William Friedkin
#28: At the 2007 Cannes Film Festival
#27: Movies That Have Sat On the Shelf
#26: Foreign Directors Making Their English Language Debut
#25: Strange Spectator Sport Movies
#24: The 2007 Summer Movie Preview
#23: A Cop Movie Cliche Lineup
#22: An Interview With Henry Rollins
#21: “Grindhouse” and Grind Houses
#20: 3D and The Return of The Gimmick
#19: Do Critics Matter?
#18: Indulgent Reflections on Movie Theaters
#17: Horror Movie Tropes
#16: Award Season Wrap-Up
#15: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Winners
#14: The Life and Times of Nicolas Cage
#13: Looking Forward To Spring
#12: Our Sundance 2007 Wrap-Up
#11: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Nominees
#10: The Worst Films of 2006
#9: Awesomely Inappropriate Holiday Fare
#8: The Best Movies of 2006
#7: Movies of 2006 Too Good To Be Forgotten
#6: Deep Into “Inland Empire”
#5: “The Nativity Story”
#4: The Year of Kamikaze Auteurism
#3: The New Didactic Film
#2: Where Have All the Biopics Gone?
#1: On “Borat”

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Bro and Tell

BFFs And Night Court For Sports

Bromance and Comeuppance On Two New Comedy Crib Series

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“Silicon Valley meets Girls meets black male educators with lots of unrealized potential.”

That’s how Carl Foreman Jr. and Anthony Gaskins categorize their new series Frank and Lamar which joins Joe Schiappa’s Sport Court in the latest wave of new series available now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. To better acquaint you with the newbies, we went right to the creators for their candid POVs. And they did not disappoint. Here are snippets of their interviews:

Frank and Lamar

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe Frank and Lamar to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Carl: Best bros from college live and work together teaching at a fancy Manhattan private school, valiantly trying to transition into a more mature phase of personal and professional life while clinging to their boyish ways.

IFC: And to a friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Carl: The same way, slightly less coherent.

Anthony: I’d probably speak about it with much louder volume, due to the bar which would probably be playing the new Kendrick Lamar album. I might also include additional jokes about Carl, or unrelated political tangents.

Carl: He really delights in randomly slandering me for no reason. I get him back though. Our rapport on the page, screen, and in real life, comes out of a lot of that back and forth.

IFC: In what way is Frank and Lamar a poignant series for this moment in time?
Carl: It tells a story I feel most people aren’t familiar with, having young black males teach in a very affluent white world, while never making it expressly about that either. Then in tackling their personal lives, we see these three-dimensional guys navigate a pivotal moment in time from a perspective I feel mainstream audiences tend not to see portrayed.

Anthony: I feel like Frank and Lamar continues to push the envelope within the genre by presenting interesting and non stereotypical content about people of color. The fact that this show brought together so many talented creative people, from the cast and crew to the producers, who believe in the project, makes the work that much more intentional and truthful. I also think it’s pretty incredible that we got to employ many of our friends!

Sport Court

Sport Court gavel

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Joe: SPORT COURT follows Judge David Linda, a circuit court judge assigned to handle an ad hoc courtroom put together to prosecute rowdy fan behavior in the basement of the Hartford Ultradome. Think an updated Night Court.

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Joe: Remember when you put those firecrackers down that guy’s pants at the baseball game? It’s about a judge who works in a court in the stadium that puts you in jail right then and there. I know, you actually did spend the night in jail, but imagine you went to court right that second and didn’t have to get your brother to take off work from GameStop to take you to your hearing.

IFC: Is there a method to your madness when coming up with sports fan faux pas?
Joe: I just think of the worst things that would ruin a sporting event for everyone. Peeing in the slushy machine in open view of a crowd seemed like a good one.

IFC: Honestly now, how many of the fan transgressions are things you’ve done or thought about doing?
Joe: I’ve thought about ripping out a whole row of chairs at a theater or stadium, so I would have my own private space. I like to think of that really whenever I have to sit crammed next to lots of people. Imagine the leg room!

Check out the full seasons of Frank and Lamar and Sport Court now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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