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The IFC News Podcast Archive

The IFC News Podcast Archive (photo)

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By far, the question we get most to our IFC News Podcast e-mail account and to our Twitter accounts is “How can I listen to older episodes of the podcasts?” Well good news podcasts fans; Christmas came a couple days late this year. While we’re still working to make all our podcasts available on iTunes, we’re pleased to present this complete archive page containing links to every single IFC News Podcast. That’s right: every single one. Even the early ones that are embarrassingly terrible that you should never listen to. (Seriously. Don’t do it.)

Still, if you’ve got 200+ hours at your disposal and you want to listen to the evolution of our podcast, now you can. And it has evolved. On our very first episode (a review of “Borat” from October 2006), we were barely capable of introducing ourselves (we also were pretty blatantly ripping off Filmspotting‘s review format). By episode #25 we started to get the hang of things, and even added rudimentary editing and sound clips. Right around episode #120 you’ll start to hear things begin to congeal into their current form, with our misdirecting introductions, feedback, and, shortly after that, The Keyword Game.

Clicking any link below will take you directly to the mp3 of that podcast. If you want to download a file to transfer it to an iPod, you can right-click and choose “Save File” on PC (or hold “Option” and click on Mac).

We’ll try to keep this page updated from now on. Enjoy all the podcasts (maybe not all of them) and thanks for listening.

The Complete IFC News Podcast Archive
(Last Updated: 02/01/2011)

#215: Our Desert Island Movies
#214: From the 2011 Sundance Film Festival
#213: Michel Gondry’s Film Party
#212: The State of Superhero Movies
#211: The Coen Brothers’ Gritty Cinema
#210: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 2
#209: Celebrating the Movies of 2010, Part 1
#208: Rating the MPAA Ratings System
#207: Boxing Movies
#206: “Black Swan” and the Life of Ballet Dancers on Film
#205: Movies About Royalty
#204: The Ingredients of Good Food Movies
#203: Movies About Veterans
#202: Bringing a Podcast to a (Danny) Boyle
#201: Performing an Autopsy on the Corpus of Torture Porn
#200: Revisiting Our Cinematic Blindspots
#199: Remembering Arthur Penn
#198: Highlights from Fantastic Fest 2010 and the 2010 New York Film Festival
#197: Directors as Swoopers and Bashers
#196: Our Faithful Look at Infidelity Movies
#195: Movies About The Price of Stardom
#194: Catching Up on the Best of 2010 on DVD
#193: Dinner Party Movies
#192: Fall 2010 Trailers
#191: Video Game Logic in Movies
#190: Speaking Out About Voice-over Narration
#189: Movie Dads, Good and Bed
#188: Following the Prestigious Mementos of Christopher Nolan’s Career
#187: The Dog-Eat-Dog World of Office Movies
#186: Airbrushing, Special Effects, and Beauty Onscreen
#185: Dysfunctional Family Movies
#184: Our Pixar Podcast
#183: All About Antiheroes
#182: Against Conventional Wisdom
#181: Urban Legends In (And Of) the Movies
#180: Great Physical Comedians
#179: Ranking the “Saturday Night Live” Movies
#178: Movies’ Representation of Fans
#177: Midlife Crisis Movies
#176: The Value of Shock Cinema
#175: How the West Was Revised
#174: Banksy and Directorial Agendas In Documentary Filmmaking
#173: Our Favorite Up and Coming Actors
#172: Kevin Smith’s Critical Dogma
#171: The Rules of Movie Time Travel
#170: From South by Southwest 2010
#169: Movie Mommies
#168: The Great 2010 Oscar Queso Challenge
#167: The Perils of Personal Filmmaking
#166: “Notstalgia”
#165: Ensemble Films
#164: John Travolta, Ham Sandwich
#163: From the 2010 Sundance Film Festival
#162: How Sundance Works
#161: Siege Films
#160: Evil Twins, Doubles, and Doppelgangers
#159: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 2
#158: Celebrating the Movies of 2009, Part 1
#157: Stars’ Fading Power
#156: Our Guilty Pleasures of the Naughts
#155: Asian and Asian-American Actors in Hollywood
#154: The John Wooniverse
#153: The Pleasures of Stop Motion Animation
#152: Submitted For Your Approval, A “Twilight Zone” Podcast
#151: Supporting Characters Worthy of Spinoffs
#150: Biopics And “Improving” On Real Life
#149: “Melancholgia”
#148: May/November Romances and Movie Cougars
#147: Girl Movies For Guys, Guy Movies For Girls
#146: Clive Owen
#145: Whistleblower Movies
#144: Our Favorite Inhospitable Settings For Movies
#143: Do Spoilers Spoil Movie Discussions?
#142: Actual College, Meet College Movies
#141: Overused Soundtrack Choices
#140: Movie Aliens As Metaphors
#139: “Docsploitation”
#138: Yes, Comic-Con HAS Nuked the Fridge
#137: Psychiatrists and Therapists In Movies
#136: Scrambled Timelines
#135: Six Summer Movie Alternatives
#134: Action Movie Auteurs
#133: The Life of a “Female Filmmaker”
#132: Trying to High Concept the “High Concept”
#131: Great Modern Uses Of Black and White Photography
#130: Memory Loss In the Movies
#129: Sam Raimi Drags Us to Hell
#128: Cannes 2009: “Antichrist” and “Up”
#127: Theme Park Rides Based on Movies
#126: Screen Siblings
#125: Modern Day Retellings of Classic Literature
#124: Mental Disability On Screen
#123: Questionable Life Lessons From Formula Films
#122: Spring 2009 Trailers
#121: Cinematic Representations of The Devil
#120: Wrestlers Enter the Acting Ring
#119: From South by Southwest 2009
#118: The Bromantic Comedy
#117: The Importance of Accuracy in Adaptations
#116: Hyperlink Cinema
#115: Are Recessions Good For Movies?
#114: “Rapping” Up Joaquin Phoenix’s Career
#113: Traumatic Children’s Movies
#112: Analyzing the 2009 Oscar Nominations
#111: From the 2009 Sundance Film Festival
#110: Mall Movies (And Vikings?)
#109: The Sundance 2009 Preview
#108: Celebrating the Movies of 2008
#107: Our Favorite Performances of 2008
#106: Are Movies Getting Longer?
#105: Journalists On Screen
#104: Giving Thanks For the World of Indie Film
#103: Alison at the Wedding / Matt Getting Married
#102: James Bond
#101: Actors Playing Themselves, Sort Of

#100: “The Killer ______ Movie”
#99: Requiem For a Video Store
#98: Comebacks We’d Like to See
#97: Notable Big Screen Comebacks
#96: Soundtracks That Overshadow Their Movies
#95: Fantastic Fest 2008
#94: Non-Kids Movies Perfect For Kids
#93: Debating Two 2008 Toronto Film Festival Films: “Miracle at St. Anna” and “Happy-Go-Lucky”
#92: The Rules of Sad Assassins
#91: A Salute to Manny Farber and “Termite Actors”
#90: The 2008 (Indie) Fall Movie Preview
#89: Famously Disastrous Film Productions
#88: The Passion of the Passion Project
#87: Has Comic-Con Nuked the Fridge?
#86: Squandered Comedic Talent
#85: From Screen to Stage to Screen Again
#84: Is This the End of Indie Film?
#83: The Wide World of Drug Movies
#82: Taking On AFI’s Ten Top Tens
#81: On Child Actors
#80: Physical Disability on Film
#79: The Art of Online Video
#78: Cannes 2008 Endpoint
#77: Cannes 2008 Midpoint
#76: Raging (Uwe) Boll
#75: Not Another Teen Movie Podcast
#74: The 2008 (Indie) Summer Movie Preview
#73: Real Time Movies
#72: Senior Citizens on the Silver Screen
#71: Gambling in the Movies
#70: Remembering Anthony Minghella
#69: The Brothers Wilson
#68: South by Southwest 2008
#67: “The ’50s” in Recent Cinema
#66: New York City’s Outer Boroughs On Screen
#65: ’80s Nostalgia
#64: The Science of Chemistry
#63: The World of Super Bowl Advertising
#62: Oscar 2008 Snubs and Surprises
#61: The Movies of Sundance 2008
#60: “The Sundance Film”
#59: On Selling Out
#58: Looking Ahead to 2008
#57: Looking Back at 2007
#56: Daddy’s Little Directors
#55: Concerning Costume Dramas
#54: Confessing Some Cinematic Blindspots
#53: Screenwriters on Screen
#52: Motion-Capture and the Changing Face of Animation
#51: Television, the Emerging Medium
#50: Ridley Scott, King of the Director’s Cut
#49: Cinematic Sophomore Slumps
#48: Vampires Through the Ages
#47: An Appreciation of Mark Wahlberg
#46: “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” and Phillip Seymour Hoffman
#45: Video Game Adaptations
#44: “Eastern Promises”
#43: The Indie Musical
#42: The 2007 Fall Movie Preview
#41: The Actor-Director
#40: Vacation Movies
#39: The Most Disturbing Sex Scenes of All Time
#38: When Singers Play Singers
#37: Movies Based on TV Shows
#36: Cerebral Science Fiction
#35: Trailer Daze 2007
#34: The Crimes of Robin Williams
#33: Bruce WIllis, Movie Star
#32: Looking Back at the First Half of 2007
#31: If We Ran Movie Studios
#30: The Cure For the Summertime Movie Blues
#29: Reevaluating William Friedkin
#28: At the 2007 Cannes Film Festival
#27: Movies That Have Sat On the Shelf
#26: Foreign Directors Making Their English Language Debut
#25: Strange Spectator Sport Movies
#24: The 2007 Summer Movie Preview
#23: A Cop Movie Cliche Lineup
#22: An Interview With Henry Rollins
#21: “Grindhouse” and Grind Houses
#20: 3D and The Return of The Gimmick
#19: Do Critics Matter?
#18: Indulgent Reflections on Movie Theaters
#17: Horror Movie Tropes
#16: Award Season Wrap-Up
#15: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Winners
#14: The Life and Times of Nicolas Cage
#13: Looking Forward To Spring
#12: Our Sundance 2007 Wrap-Up
#11: Predicting the 2007 Oscar Nominees
#10: The Worst Films of 2006
#9: Awesomely Inappropriate Holiday Fare
#8: The Best Movies of 2006
#7: Movies of 2006 Too Good To Be Forgotten
#6: Deep Into “Inland Empire”
#5: “The Nativity Story”
#4: The Year of Kamikaze Auteurism
#3: The New Didactic Film
#2: Where Have All the Biopics Gone?
#1: On “Borat”

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Thank Azaria

Best. Characters. Ever.

Our favorite Hank Azaria characters.

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GIFs via Giphy

Hank Azaria may well be the most prolific voice and character actor of our time. The work he’s done for The Simpsons alone has earned him a permanent place in the pop culture zeitgeist. And now he’s bringing another character to the mainstream: a washed-up sports announcer named Jim Brockmire, in the aptly titled new series Brockmire.

We’re looking forward to it. So much so that we want to look backward, too, with a short-but-sweet retrospective of some of Azaria’s important characters. Shall we begin?

Half The Recurring Simpsons Characters

He’s Comic Book Guy. He’s Chief Wiggum. He’s Apu. He’s Cletus. He’s Snake. He’s Superintendent Chalmers. He’s the Sea Captain. He’s Kurt “Can I Borrow A Feeling” Van Houten. He’s Professor Frink. He’s Carl. And he’s many more. But most importantly he’s Moe Szyslak, the staple character Azaria has voiced since his very first audition for The Simpsons.

Oh, and He’s Frank Grimes

For all the regular Simpsons characters Azaria has played over the years, his most brilliant performance may have been a one-off: Frank Grimes, the scrappy bootstrapper who worked tirelessly all his life for honest, incremental, and easily-undermined success. Azaria’s portrayal of this character was nuanced, emotional, and simply magical.

Patches O’Houlihan

Dodgeball is a “sport of violence, exclusion and degradation.” as Hank Azaria generously points out in his brief but crucial cameo in Dodgeball. That’s sage wisdom. Try applying his “five D’s” to your life on and off the court and enjoy the results.

Harold Zoid

Of Futurama fame. The crazy uncle of Dr. Zoidberg, Harold Zoid was once a lion (or lobster) of the silver screen until Smell-o-vision forced him into retirement.

Agador

The Birdcage was significant for many reasons, and the comic genius of Hank Azaria’s character “Agador” sits somewhere towards the top of that list. If you haven’t seen this movie, shame on you.

Gargamel

Nobody else could make a live-action Gargamel possible.

Ed Cochran

From Ray Donovan. Great character, great last name [editorial note: the author of this article may be bias].

Kahmunra, The Thinker, Abe Lincoln

All in the Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian, a file that let Azaria flex his voice acting and live-action muscles in one fell swoop.

The Blue Raja

Mystery Men has everything, including a fatal case of Smash Mouth. Azaria’s iconic superhero makes the shortlist of redeemable qualities, though.

Dr. Huff

Huff put Azaria in a leading role, and it was good. So good that there is no good gif of it. Internet? More like Inter-not.

Learn more about Hank Azaria’s newest claim to fame right here, and don’t miss the premiere of Brockmire April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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Sneak_Peek

Flame Out

Brockmire and Other Public Implosions

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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There’s less than a month until the Brockmire premiere, and to say we’re excited would be an insulting understatement. It’s not just that it stars Hank Azaria, who can do no wrong (and yes, that’s including Mystery Men, which is only cringeworthy because of Smash Mouth). It’s that the whole backstory of the titular character, Jim Brockmire, is the stuff of legends. A one-time iconic sportscaster who won the hearts of fans and players alike, he fell from grace after an unfortunate personal event triggered a seriously public meltdown. See for yourself in the NSFW Funny or Die digital short that spawned the IFC series:

See? NSFW and spectacularly catastrophic in a way that could almost be real. Which got us thinking: What are some real-life sports fails that have nothing to do with botched athletics and everything to do with going tragically off script? The internet is a dark and dirty place, friends, but these three examples are pretty special and mostly safe for work…

Disgruntled Sports Reporter

His co-anchor went offsides and he called it like he saw it.

Jim Rome vs Jim “Not Chris” Everett

You just don’t heckle a professional athlete when you’re within striking distance. Common sense.

Carl Lewis’s National Anthem

He killed it! As in murdered. It’s dead.

To see more moments just like these, we recommend spending a day in your pajamas combing through the muckiness of the internet. But to see something that’s Brockmire-level funny without having to clear your browser history, check out the sneak peeks and extras here.

Don’t miss the premiere of Brockmire April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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POR_710_D1

Mirror, Mirror

Portlandia Season 7 In Hindsight

Portlandia Season 7 Now Available Online and on the IFC App.

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Another season of Portlandia is behind us, and oh what a season it was. We laughed. We cried. And we chuckled uncomfortably while glancing nervously around the room. Like every season before it, the latest Portlandia has held a mirror up to ridiculousness of modern American life, but more than ever that same mirror has reflected our social reality in ways that are at once hysterical and sneakily thought-provoking. Here are just a few of the issues they tackled:

Nationalism

So long, America, Portland is out! And yes, the idea of Portland seceding is still less ludicrous than building a wall.

Men’s Rights

We all saw this coming. Exit gracefully, dudes.

Protests

Whatever you stand for, stand for it together. Or with at least one other person.

Free Love

No matter who we are or how we love, deep down we all have the ability to get stalky.

Social Status

Modern self-esteem basically hinges on likes, so this isn’t really a stretch at all.

These moments are just the tip of the iceberg, and much more can be found in the full seventh season of #Portlandia, available right now #online and on the #IFC app.

via GIPHY

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