DID YOU READ

AFI Fest 2010: Quentin Dupieux, the One-Man “Rubber” Band

AFI Fest 2010: Quentin Dupieux, the One-Man “Rubber” Band (photo)

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Anyone who has seen “Rubber” during its most unlikely of festival runs will know what a big deal it was for the film’s star, Robert the tire, to finally roll into Hollywood last weekend for its premiere at AFI Fest, where the guest of honor donned a bowtie for the occasion and posed for pictures at the film’s afterparty. That audience members would want to pose with a tire they had just seen crush bugs, explode rabbits and eventually blow up the human population of a small desert town with its mind is a testament to the strength of the simple idea at the core of Quentin Dupieux’s sharp absurdist comic thriller.

A tribute in some ways to films like Steven Spielberg’s “Duel,” but on one wheel instead of four, the instant identification of “Rubber” as “that killer movie” has made it an easy recommendation among festivalgoers, yet that description hardly does justice to the alternate reality Dupieux creates. Giving himself the license to do anything he pleases after breaking the fourth wall for an introduction from an investigating lieutenant (Stephen Spinella) who tells audience directly, “All great films contain no reason,” and rattling off examples in “Love Story” and “E.T.” as evidence, Dupieux imagines a world in which cops inexplicably carry stuffed crocodiles under their arms and tourists will camp out to watch a tire telekinetically explode the heads of any person who dare step in front of it.

In other words, it’s the kind of film you might expect from Dupieux, a known iconoclast from his days of spinning as a DJ under the pseudonym Mr. Oizo. Now a remixer of images as well as sounds, he took a break from the festival to talk about “Rubber,” the limits of French cinema and why education can only limit creativity.

How did you come up with this idea?

Honestly, I don’t know because when you want to make movies, you’re basically always thinking. You have tons of ideas per day. And you have tons of bad ideas. Your brain is always trying to find good ideas. The tire came and I just picked it up, like okay, this is good, interesting… and that’s it. I wrote it in three weeks because I decided with my producer to shoot a movie quickly – write it quick, shoot it quick, edit it quick and I finished the shooting here a year ago exactly.

11102010_Rubber1.jpgThis was actually an alternative to another film you were working on. Did that development process have an impact on how you approached this film?

Yeah, I’d been writing this other script for a year-and-a-half. It’s called “Reality,” and the script is really good, but we realized that it was quite hard to finance because it’s a bit expensive and it has a lot of actors, a lot of locations. So my producer started to look for money to do it and in the mean time, we decided instead of waiting, we decided, let’s do a pirate movie – a commando movie. Let’s do something we can do now, something you could shoot in two weeks. And then I wrote “Rubber” very quickly and we did it with almost nothing, like less than a Kanye West video. Less.

It sounds like you wrote the film first and figured out the logistics of having the tire as your star later.

The process of finding the tire is quite stupid because first, I wrote ten pages of a script called “Day of the Cubes” and it was almost the same idea, but it was not about the tire, it was about an army of cubes from space — one day people wake up and there are cubes floating everywhere. I was already trying to do a fantastic movie, like oh something strange is happening. But then we quickly did CGI tests and I realized that no, I don’t want to do this. CGI is not funny. I’m going to shoot empty spaces and then we’re going to work on computers to put the cubes [onscreen]? So I decided to get rid of those 10 pages and start again. Instead of doing an army of cubes, I decided to focus on one character – the tire.

How long did it take to find the personality of the tire?

Honestly, when I wrote the script, for the tire sequences, I was thinking of the first 30 minutes of “Wall-E.” To me, it was the same kind of spirit. I just tried to give life to a dead object. First, it was like [the tire is] going to be a bit like Wall-E, even if it’s like Rambo and make things explode. I wanted it to be something cute in the beginning. In my mind, it was like okay, it’s going to be nice to see him trying to roll and fall and wake up.

It was quite hard to shoot. “Okay, we can’t do this, we can’t do this, we can’t do this.” It was a bit like “Jaws.” Spielberg was having trouble with the remote-controlled shark and he had to create something different because the shark was not working. So that’s a bit the same because the possibilities were very limited with the tire. Basically, we had a remote-controlled tire, but it was just able to roll, stop and roll again. That’s it. So we had to do a lot of stuff with a puppeteer out of frame and I created the character and his personality on set.

11102010_Rubber2.jpgWhen you set up a movie where you tell the audience in the first frames of the movie that there is “no reason” for what you’re about to see, did that push you towards strictly going for the unexpected?

No, to me, it’s a good way to take people’s hand and bring them into the movie. I think it’s a very good first scene. If you cut it and you start the movie with the tire waking up, the movie’s totally different. This scene – this long monologue – gives the tone and when we first showed the movie in Cannes, it was the first time with an audience, and I realized the monologue was working because people were laughing and were getting the spirit and the tone. It’s more like a warning. If you don’t like this, go away now because it’s going to be hard for you.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

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It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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