DID YOU READ

“Sound of Noise,” Reviewed

“Sound of Noise,” Reviewed (photo)

Posted by on

Reviewed at Fantastic Fest 2010.

For a fresh take on the heist movie, just add music. The inventive Swedish comedy “Sound of Noise” (directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson) is about a band of musical malcontents who break into a hospital, a bank (“This is a gig! We’re only here for the music!” they yell) and other public places to play compositions using the surroundings as their instruments. Led by Sanna (Sanna Persson), the sextet attempt to perform a piece called “Music for One City and Six Drummers” that composer Magnus (Magnus Börjeson) describes, in a mild understatement, as “conceptual.”

But in a town where the major musical excitement surrounds a Haydn concert and speakers on the street pipe in saccharine muzak, a little sonic terrorism doesn’t seem entirely out of the question. It’s “Sound of Noise”‘s central lark that instead of this rebellion arriving via the usual path of rock and roll, it comes from an anarchist collective of black glasses-wearing musical outcasts who take their aesthetic principals as seriously as similar ones would take their political beliefs.

Sanna, inspired by Magnus’ work, decides it has to be performed despite the risks, and in gladdening twist on the typical recruiting-the-team scenario retrieves worthy colleagues from unhappy gigs as the rhythm sections of house bands and orchestras. But the team’s actions — they keep time with and leave behind at each location an old-fashioned metronome — attract the attention of the local law enforcement. The case is assigned to Amadeus Warnebring (Bengt Nilsson), the tone-deaf policeman son of a famous musical family, who sets about tracking the dissidents as they work their way through the four movements of their symphony.

“Sound of Noise” is light and insubstantial as a feather, but the performances are something to see. The six drummers use everything from a paper shredder to electric wires to power tools to an unconscious human being to make their music, the percussion combining to make aurally interesting tunes edited rhythmically to emphasize how they’re being sculpted out of the everyday sounds we’ve long ago stopped noticing.

The short from which “Sound of Noise” came, “Music for One Apartment and Six Drummers,” is up on YouTube:

“Sound of Noise” does not yet have US distribution.

Soap tv show

As the Spoof Turns

15 Hilarious Soap Opera Parodies

Catch the classic sitcom Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Columbia Pictures Television

The soap opera is the indestructible core of television fandom. We celebrate modern series like The Wire and Breaking Bad with their ongoing storylines, but soap operas have been tangling more plot threads than a quilt for decades. Which is why pop culture enjoys parodying them so much.

Check out some of the funniest soap opera parodies below, and be sure to catch Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

1. Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman

maryhartman

Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman was a cult hit soap parody from the mind of Norman Lear that poked daily fun at the genre with epic twists and WTF moments. The first season culminated in a perfect satire of ratings stunts, with Mary being both confined to a psychiatric facility and chosen to be part of a Nielsen ratings family.


2. IKEA Heights

ikea heights

IKEA Heights proves that the soap opera is alive and well, even if it has to be filmed undercover at a ready-to-assemble furniture store totally unaware of what’s happening. This unique webseries brought the classic formula to a new medium. Even IKEA saw the funny side — but has asked that future filmmakers apply through proper channels.


3. Fresno

fresno

When you’re parodying ’80s nighttime soaps like Dallas and Dynasty , everything about your show has to equally sumptuous. The 1986 CBS miniseries Fresno delivered with a high-powered cast (Carol Burnett, Teri Garr and more in haute couture clothes!) locked in the struggle for the survival of a raisin cartel.


4. Soap

soap

Soap was the nighttime response to daytime soap operas: a primetime skewering of everything both silly and satisfying about the source material. Plots including demonic possession and alien abduction made it a cult favorite, and necessitated the first televised “viewer discretion” disclaimer. It also broke ground for featuring one of the first gay characters on television in the form of Billy Crystal’s Jodie Dallas. Revisit (or discover for the first time) this classic sitcom every Saturday morning on IFC.


5. Too Many Cooks

cooks2

Possibly the most perfect viral video ever made, Too Many Cooks distilled almost every style of television in a single intro sequence. The soap opera elements are maybe the most hilarious, with more characters and sudden shocking twists in an intro than most TV scribes manage in an entire season.


6. Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace

darkplace

Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace was more mockery than any one medium could handle. The endless complications of Darkplace Hospital are presented as an ongoing horror soap opera with behind-the-scenes anecdotes from writer, director, star, and self-described “dreamweaver visionary” Garth Marenghi and astoundingly incompetent actor/producer Dean Learner.


7. “Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive,” MadTV

attitudes

Soap opera connoisseurs know that the most melodramatic plots are found in Korea. MADtv‘s parody Tae Do  (translation: Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive) features the struggles of mild-mannered characters with far more feelings than their souls, or subtitles, could ever cope with.


8. Twin Peaks

peaks

Twin Peaks, the twisted parody of small town soaps like Peyton Place whose own creator repeatedly insists is not a parody, has endured through pop culture since it changed television forever when it debuted in 1990. The show even had it’s own soap within in a soap called…


9. “Invitation to Love,” Twin Peaks

invitation

Twin Peaks didn’t just parody soap operas — it parodied itself parodying soap operas with the in-universe show Invitation to Love. That’s more layers of deceit and drama than most televised love triangles.


10. “As The Stomach Turns,” The Carol Burnett Show

stomach

The Carol Burnett Show poked fun at soaps with this enduring take on As The World Turns. In a case of life imitating art, one story involving demonic possession would go on to happen for “real” on Days of Our Lives.


11. Days of our Lives (Friends Edition)

joey

Still airing today, Days of Our Lives is one of the most famous soap operas of all time. They’re also excellent sports, as they allowed Friends star Joey Tribbiani to star as Dr Drake Ramoray, the only doctor to date his own stalker (while pretending to be his own evil twin). And then return after a brain-transplant.

And let’s not forget the greatest soap opera parody line ever written: “Come on Joey, you’re going up against a guy who survived his own cremation!”


12. Acorn Antiques

acorn

First appearing on the BBC sketch comedy series Victoria Wood As Seen on TV, Acorn Antiques combines almost every low-budget soap opera trope into one amazing whole. The staff of a small town antique store suffer a disproportional number of amnesiac love-triangles, while entire storylines suddenly appear and disappear without warning or resolution. Acorn Antiques was so popular, it went on to become a hit West End musical.


13. “Point Place,” That 70s Show

pointplace

In a memorable That ’70s Show episode, an unemployed Red is reduced to watching soaps all day. He becomes obsessed despite the usual Red common-sense objections (like complaining that it’s impossible to fall in love with someone in a coma). His dreams render his own life as Point Place, a melodramatic nightmare where Kitty leaves him because he’s unemployed. (Click here to see all airings of That ’70s Show on IFC.)


14. The Spoils of Babylon

spoils

Bursting from the minds of Will Ferrell and creators Andrew Steele and Matt Piedmont, The Spoils of Babylon was a spectacular parody of soap operas and epic mini-series like The Thorn Birds. Taking the parody even further, Ferrell himself played Eric Jonrosh, the author of the book on which the series was based. Jonrosh returned in The Spoils Before Dying, a jazzy murder mystery with its own share of soapy twists and turns.

spoilsdying


15. All My Children Finale, SNL

allmychildren

SNL‘s final celebration of one of the biggest soaps of all time is interrupted by a relentless series of revelations from stage managers, lighting designers, make-up artists, and more. All of whom seem to have been married to or murdered by (or both) each other.

Celebrating Roger Corman With Blood, Breasts, Beasts and “Sharktopus”

Celebrating Roger Corman With Blood, Breasts, Beasts and “Sharktopus” (photo)

Posted by on

“I know when most people go to see documentaries, they expect to learn something,” said “Machete Maidens Unleashed” director Mark Hartley before the film’s Fantastic Fest premiere. “If you expect to learn something, you should go outside and read a book for the next 85 minutes.”

But a funny thing happened on the way to the Paramount – you do learn quite a bit about the Filipino exploitation films of the 1960s and ’70s from Hartley’s follow-up to his wildly entertaining history of the Australian exploitation film, “Not Quite Hollywood,” even if it’s not what you’d quite expect. Like that film, “Machete Maidens Unleashed” is often more fun than the films it tells the behind-the-scenes stories of since it freely uses the money shots and arrives bursting with energy to spare. At once, the film is a tribute to native Filipino directors Cirio Santiago, Bobby Suarez and Gerardo de Leon, who built an industry out of “blood, breasts and beasts” and benefited from the Philippines’ tropical locale and cheap labor, while it also diverges into a loving biography of Roger Corman, who seized upon the land of low production costs for his women-in-prison flicks like “The Big Doll House.”

Not surprisingly, the lack of dull bits pleased Corman, who came out with his wife and producing partner Julie during the “Machete Maidens Unleashed” Q & A to join the conversation and present his own latest film, the SyFy production “Sharktopus.” For fans still reeling from the ample use of footage from “Black Mama, White Mama” and “The Big Bird Cage” in Hartley’s film, the Cormans offered a ray of hope when they jointly said a return to the Philippines might be on the horizon (“We’ve been talking to Cirio [Santiago]’s son Chris, Julie said; somewhere longtime admirer Quentin Tarantino’s ears were burning).

(more…)

Andrew Lau’s Kiss With a “Fist”

Andrew Lau’s Kiss With a “Fist” (photo)

Posted by on

When talking to Andrew Lau, one of the first things to emerge is his tendency to drop in the ba-ba-ba sound of machine gun fire or plwww of explosions into casual conversation. Maybe it’s his way of being descriptive to an American journalist when English isn’t his first language, but then again, Mandarin might even be considered a second language to the auteur who has had an international impact on the vocabulary of action cinema. First as a protégé of the Shaw Brothers before becoming a cinematographer on films such as Ringo Lam’s “City on Fire” and “As Tears Go By” and then as the director of the “Infernal Affairs” trilogy (with Alan Mak), Lau has helped define an entire era of Hong Kong cinema.

His latest, “Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen,” takes one of the most famous of Chinese legends – a masked hero bent on vengeance for the death of his master that’s so enduring it’s been the basis for Bruce Lee’s “Fist of Fury” and later Jet Li in “Fist of Legend” — and reinvented it for the modern era, filming an incredibly epic war sequence, particularly for a Chinese production, that becomes one of the most memorable first five minutes in recent memory when Donnie Yen appears on the battlefield of World War I as the mysterious leader of a group of Chinese laborers recruited to fight with the Allied Forces. Needless to say, the enemies’ guns are of little use when Yen’s Chen Zhen swoops out of the sky to clutch a soldier’s head between his thighs and proceeds to twist his neck before dismantling an entire army with just the speed and power of his fists and feet.

While the film will be making its U.S. premiere this afternoon at Fantastic Fest in Austin, I caught up with Lau during the Toronto Film Festival to talk about reinterpreting such a beloved figure in Chinese culture, his semi-legendary temper and pulling off the film’s bravura opening sequence.

(more…)

Powered by ZergNet