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Toronto 2010: Richard Ayoade Steers “Submarine”

Toronto 2010: Richard Ayoade Steers “Submarine” (photo)

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“I have a very sarcastic sounding, insincere voice,” joked Richard Ayoade during his introduction to “Submarine,” an adaptation of Joe Dunthorne’s coming-of-age novel about Oliver Tate (Craig Roberts), a 15-year-old consumed with looking up words like “atavistic” in the dictionary, saving his parents (Sally Hawkins and Noah Taylor) from being split up by a mulleted motivational speaker (Paddy Considine), and romancing his humble classmate Jordana Bevan (Yasmin Paige).

Certainly, Ayoade can be self-effacing, as one might know from his turn as a regular on Britcoms auch as “The IT Crowd,” but as a first-time director, he is never anything less than genuine, even while wringing laughs from the most embarrassing of experiences from growing up. His directorial debut will surely draw comparisons to Wes Anderson and Hal Ashby for its bittersweet take on adolescence told with style to spare, but “Submarine” is a wholly original creation that I must admit I couldn’t hear all the dialogue for since raucous laughter was constantly trampling over the lines at the film’s premiere at the Toronto Film Festival.

09172010_RichardAyoadeSubmarine.jpgShortly before Ayoade and his “Submarine” crew (including Ben Stiller, an executive producer) closed a deal with the Weinstein Company to bring the film to audiences everywhere soon enough, he sat down to discuss making the jump to making features from directing videos for the likes of Vampire Weekend and the Arctic Monkeys (frontman Alex Turner returns the favor with an original soundtrack for the film), the unusual influences for his teenage tale, and the sequel he’d like to tackle next.

How did this become your first feature?

It was, in many respects, random in that I had done a music video for Warp [the film’s production company] and somebody who works at Warp went to college with Joe Dunthorne, who had written the novel, so they sent me it before it had come out. I wasn’t aware of the book through being shopped or anything and they thought I might be worth considering to adapt it and I just decided to try because I really liked the book and didn’t necessarily think it was translatable very readily and it’s very internal, it’s all in the first person.

There were a number of things that seemed to indicate you shouldn’t try to adapt it, but I’ve always liked that subject area, partly because it feels peculiarly American, I guess. A show like “Dawson’s Creek” is unthinkable in England or “My So-Called Life” or “The Wonder Years” or anything like that, or “The Graduate” or those John Hughes films. There’s no real genre of that in England of what you’d call the teen genre. It just doesn’t exist. So I’ve always been very interested in that.

09172010_Submarine6.jpgI imagine that’s something you both wanted to embrace for particular story beats and overcome to make something original.

The thing you don’t necessarily think about more in this than potentially doing any genre of film, whether they’re the well-mined tropes of the horror film or a thriller or all of those types of films, is that they have their own clichés and rules and in some sense, it’s inescapable. You just hope that the characters in it feel real and right and it felt from the novel, there’s something different about the character of Oliver Tate that was different to characters I’ve seen in other things or read about in other books, so I guess that gave me the confidence to try and attempt it.

You mentioned the other night that many of the things in Oliver’s room were similar to knickknacks you had as a kid — how much of yourself did you want in the film?

I suppose you end up investing yourself into it in some regards because that’s your way of attacking it, in the same way that I think all good acting performances have something of the person playing them brought to it. Otherwise, it becomes a form of mimicry that doesn’t have any depth to it. So inevitably, you bring things that have meaning to you or you feel will inform it in some way or things that you feel are correct. I like in “The Graduate” how Dustin Hoffman is said to give Mike Nichols’ cough and Mike Nichols did that in meetings. If you put personal things into what you do, you feel that it’s authentic or they have some form of meaning to you.

Since you came up as a comedian, that’s such an improv-heavy medium and you’re obviously a film geek and this film has such precision. Did those two things collide on this film?

I think it’s both in a way that I suppose, for example, a lot of comedians write through improvisation and that you end up boiling it down and you keep the good bits. I think improvisation for its own sake isn’t particularly interesting.

09172010_SallyHawkinsSubmarine.jpgThere’s a tension when someone’s improvising in the room because there’s a one-offness to it, but as soon as it’s captured, it can seem incredibly baggy and self-indulgent and meandering, so you hope to have the illusion of improvisation without the long passages of rubbish that can come out of it.

You mentioned “The Graduate,” but were there other films that got you in the mood to make this one?

Oddly enough, the films that felt most directly influential on it were “Taxi Driver” and “Badlands,” not because of the subject matter particularly, but the dispassionate voiceover and they’re both having central characters who have an idea of their own legacy and even though clearly the subject matter of this is much less cataclysmic or violent or brooding or mythic than those films, there’s something about having a character with a stated view of reality juxtaposed with the view of reality the audience sees.


Final Countdown

The Best Of The Last

Portlandia Goes Out With A Bang

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The end is near. In mere days Portlandia wraps up its final season, and oh what a season it’s been. Lucky for you, you can watch the entire season right now right here and on the IFC app, including this free episode courtesy of Subaru.

But now, let’s take a moment to look back at some of the new classics Fred and Carrie have so thoughtfully bestowed upon us. (We’ll be looking back through tear-blurred eyes, but you do you.)

Couples Dinner

It’s not that being single sucks, it’s that you suck if you’re single.

Cancel it!

A sketch for anyone who has cancelled more appointments than they’ve kept. Which is everyone.

Forgotten America

This one’s a “Serial” killer…everything both right and wrong about true crime podcasts.

Wedding Planners

The only bad wedding is a boring wedding.

Disaster Hut

It’s only the end of the world if your doomsday kit doesn’t include rosé.

Catch up on Portlandia’s final episodes on demand and at


Rev Up

Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.


Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.

Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…