Christopher Nolan: No 3D, no cell phone, lots of diagrams.

Christopher Nolan: No 3D, no cell phone, lots of diagrams. (photo)

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“I don’t have e-mail, a cell phone…it gives me more time to think,” said Christopher Nolan, which might’ve been the greatest revelation from his appearance at this weekend’s inaugural Los Angeles Times Hero Complex Film Festival. His admission came in response to a question about online chatter concerning his films, though it was evident others are keeping track of his tight schedule, as he stopped by for a 45-minute chat with the Times’ Geoff Boucher during a break from the dub stage for “Inception.”

Although the talk was sandwiched between a double bill of “Insomnia” and “The Dark Knight,” the subject quickly turned to his latest film. There was a wave of excitement when the end credits of “Insomnia” led directly into an MPAA green band, which proved to be the beginning of “Inception” trailer #3, which is available online. Shortly after, Nolan was greeted with a standing ovation as he made his way to the stage and after a question about Robin Williams’ performance in “Insomnia” — which the director called “flawless” and considered himself lucky that it came out before “One Hour Photo,” even though “Insomnia” was shot later — Boucher started in with questions about this summer’s most anticipated film.

06122010_Inception.jpg“I’ve wanted to make a film about dreams since I was a kid,” Nolan told the audience and mentioned that he pitched the film to Warner Brothers right after finishing “Insomnia.” He gave a basic synopsis that largely resembled his recent comments to Empire magazine, about a team of extractors that can steal information from the mind. “I thought it would take months, but it took me 10 years,” said Nolan about the writing process that followed.

While he conceived of “Inception” as a heist film, he couldn’t complete it since he felt “heist films tend to be deliberately superficial,” a problem he knew was solved by the casting of Leonardo DiCaprio, of whom he likened to Guy Pearce in “Memento” with his ability to “find the emotional truth of the character.” (When Boucher brought up that six of the eight actors whose names appear on “Inception”‘s poster had been nominated for Oscars, Nolan got a laugh when he shrugged, ” I hadn’t noticed actually…it’s an incredible cast.” He also got a rise out of the audience when he said he screened “Pink Floyd’s The Wall” for cast and crew right before shooting for inspiration and “it was shocking to everybody”; he’s presenting the film next week at the L.A. Film Festival.)

But Nolan didn’t have a hard time winning over the discerning fanboy crowd. He championed practical effects, which he used extensively in concert with CG for “Inception,” explaining that he learned on “Batman Begins” that effects artists need something to start out with. After doing tests with a digital Batman, he thought most of the audience could be fooled, but he wasn’t. (“I could tell. [The artists] weren’t real happy, but it was incredibly close.”) He continued, “If you can photograph something real…they’re able to do much, much better work.”

Nolan also appeared disinterested in discussing 3D, though he couldn’t help but give a well-reasoned response to why “Inception” is one of the rare summer blockbusters to elude the treatment. “I’m not a huge fan of 3D,” said Nolan to the cheers of the audience before mentioning that he did tests with post-conversion. “They looked good, but they wouldn’t have the time to get up to my standards.” Taken out of context, those comments might appear that he was flirting with the process, but he continued, “I find the dimness of the image extremely alienating” when projecting a 3D film and mentioned the “enormous compromises” he would have to make like shooting on video first to accommodate the 3D process. He left a door open when he said “post-conversion would be the future” for him personally, if he were to make a 3D film, and acknowledged that “audiences will decide” 3D’s fate, but seemingly shut it when he said in a later answer, “I find it impossible as a viewer to forget I’m watching a movie [in 3D].”

06122010_TheDarkKnight.jpgHe also took questions about his involvement in “Superman” (“I thought [David Goyer’s] pitch was terrific and I didn’t want it to not get done,” but stressed he was only a producer on the project) and dished a little on “The Dark Knight,” saying there was a direct connection to Richard Donner’s “Superman” to his take on Batman: “I wanted to make the Batman film that would’ve been made in ’78, ’79…[Warner Brothers] never did the Dick Donner version of an extraordinary person in an ordinary world” with an esteemed cast filling out the supporting roles. Boucher also prodded Nolan to talk about his favorite scene of “The Dark Knight” — the Joker’s interrogation sequence, which he made distinctive with bright lighting and wanted near the beginning of the film — and its incredible financial success in comparison to “Batman Begins,” which Nolan believed “suffered from a lot of suspicion of the franchise” with audiences at first, but allowed for “the massive benefit of showing what you can do with the character.”

Comic book writer Ed Brubaker was in the audience and asked Nolan about his writing process and whether how much he outlines his screenplays, to which Nolan responded he doesn’t use outlines, but “I draw a lot of diagrams. It all gets a bit ‘Beautiful Mind.'” He also writes in a linear fashion and always plans to do rewrites later to “make it flow.” “It’s almost like you write a bunch of dailies and edit it into a more comprehensible form.”

[Photos: “Inception,” Warner Bros., 2010; “The Dark Knight,” Warner Bros., 2007]


Bob & David Are Back

Watch David Cross, Bob Odenkirk and Scott Aukerman in the Hilarious ‘With Bob & David’ Trailer

Catch David Cross in the return of Todd Margaret on January 7th at 10P on IFC.

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David Cross (Todd Margaret), Bob Odenkirk (Better Call Saul) and Comedy Bang! Bang! host Scott Aukerman are back with the trailer for the long-awaited Mr. Show “non-reunion” reunion, W/ Bob & David.

The upcoming Netflix sketch comedy show reunites Bob and David with Mr. Show writers and performers John Ennis, Jay Johnston, Paul F. Tompkins, Brian Posehn and Mr. Hot Saucerman himself, Scott Aukerman. But this is not a Mr. Show reunion. In March, Odenkirk told Rolling Stone that W/ Bob & David is “a new sketch-comedy show featuring the writing and performing of the great and special Bob and David and please use those terms because it’s like [the] King of Pop — the Great and Special Bob and David.”

Still, Bob and David fans will notice that the new show tackles topics like time travel, police interrogations and eccentric tech wizards with the same absurdist wit that made Mr. Show a comedy classic. Also, lots of wigs. You can’t have a sketch show without wigs.

After you’ve binge-watched W/ Bob & David in November, be sure to catch David in the third season of Todd Margaret when it premieres Thursday, January 7th at 10P ET/PT on IFC. The first three episodes of the six-episode series air back-to-back on January 7th, with the remaining three episodes premiering the following week on Thursday, January 14th at 10pm ET/PT. Finally those cans of Thunder Muscle you’ve been hoarding for a rainy day will come in handy.

Ghostbusters Everett

Ghostbusters In Hell?

7 Lost Ghostbusters Movies That Almost Happened

Catch a Ghostbusters marathon Saturday, Nov. 7th starting at 8P.

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With a new Ghostbusters movie set to debut next year, it’s time to start getting ready for an all out blitz of slime-flavored nostalgia. It’s been 26 years since we’ve seen a Ghostbuster on the big screen, although it hasn’t been for a lack of trying. Ray Stantz himself, Dan Aykroyd, has fought to make another movie in the franchise for decades. Bill Murray famously stood in the way of his efforts, refusing to even read a script. But behind this Ghostbusters Cold War, there were always a plethora of rumors, many coming from Aykroyd himself. Before you catch the Ghostbusters movies this month on IFC, check out a few of the Ghostbusters projects that could’ve been.

1. Ghostbusters in the Future

Columbia Pictures

In Making Ghostbusters by Don Shay, director Ivan Reitman recalled the stacks of pages Aykroyd had spent years putting together when he first joined the project. Originally conceived as a Blues Brothers-esque romp for Aykroyd and John Belushi, the early versions of the script saw a team of “Ghostsmashers” battling demons through a variety of “different planets or dimensional planes.” Reitman describes the first pages as one unending action sequence that was heavy on the ghost busting, light on anything else. He guessed those 50 pages would cost hundreds of millions of dollars (and these are ’80s dollars, remember) so the team went back to the drawing board.

2. Ghostbusters: The Next Generation

Paramount Pictures

Many considered Ghostbusters II a disappointment. Murray supposedly described it as “a whole lot of slime, and not much of us.” Apparently Aykroyd wasn’t in that camp, almost immediately starting work on ideas for a third film. The concept he quickly hit on, and has seemingly continued to champion in one form or another for the last two decades, was the idea of introducing a new, young crop of Ghostbusters. Over the years the rumors of who these new ‘busters might be, often started by Aykroyd himself, have included everyone from comedy superstars to TV witches. Chris Farley, Will Smith, Chris Rock, and Ben Stiller all seem like obvious choices. As time went on Bill Hader, Seth Rogen and Anna Faris joined the list. But Alyssa Milano, Eliza Dushku and Criminal Minds actor Matthew Gray Gubler? Aykroyd may have been drinking a bit too much of his Crystal Skull vodka at that point.

3. Ghostbusters Vs. Greek Gods

Columbia Pictures

In the late ’90s, rumors started to circulate that a script for a third Ghostbusters was ready to go. An early indication of how to sidestep Murray’s involvement, this outing would deal with Egon and Ray trying to keep the business afloat while battling Hades, Greek God of the Underworld. But it appears those rumors were just that. No script has ever seen the light of day.

4. Ghostbusters 3: Hellbent

Aykroyd, along with former SNL writer Tom Davis, penned the script for this iteration. The concept involved the Ghostbusters being sucked into an alternate version of Manhattan, called Manhellton, where the people and places of New York City were replaced by demonic versions. Of course, a new crew was involved. IGN reported at the time that the new team included a pierced New Jersey punk, a “pretty but uptight gymnast,” a “Latino beauty,” a “dread-locked dude” and a young genius whose giant brain made his head comically over-sized. The main villain was reportedly the Devil by way of Donald Trump, which shows Aykroyd may hate ghosts, but he might just be psychic. While the script was never produced (Murray dubbed it “too crazy to comprehend), the story was repurposed as a video game in 2009, with the original cast reprising their roles.

5. Ghostbusters: Cadets

Columbia Pictures

In 2009, Aykroyd and Ramis were at it again, talking up the idea of a new generation of Ghostbusters. Though Murray still wasn’t on board, Aykroyd laid out his vision for the threequel, which would center on the team “learning how to use the psychotron, the accelerators…all these great tools that they’re going to have.” Um…okay? What’s wrong with good ol’ fashioned proton packs?

6. Ghostbusters 3: Grumpy Old ‘Busters


In 2011, Aykroyd dropped hints that the original Ghostbusters would return, even without Murray’s involvement. This time the script would play up their age, adding “My character, Ray, is now blind in one eye and can’t drive the Cadillac…He’s got a bad knee and can’t carry the packs…Egon is too large to get into the harness.” Thank Gozer we never had to see Ray huffing and puffing while carrying a proton pack.

7. Ghostbusters 3: The Return of Oscar?

Columbia Pictures

With Aykroyd trying, and failing, over and over again to get something going, Harold Ramis decided to step in. He hired The Office scribes Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg, who also wrote Ramis’ big screen comedy Year One, to put together a script from scratch. Supposedly centered on Peter Venkman and Dana Barrett’s grown son Oscar joining the team, there was some momentum. Once again, Murray still refused to play ball, reportedly shredding a copy of the script and joking he would only appear in the film as a ghost. With the studio refusing to move ahead without Murray’s involvement, the project petered out. The final nail in the coffin appears to be Year One itself. Murray said in a interview at the time, “Well, I never went to see Year One, but people who did, including other Ghostbusters, said it was one of the worst things they had ever seen in their lives.”


Super Awkward

The 10 Most Hilariously Awkward Sex Comedies

Get racy with Gigi Does It Mondays at 10:30P.

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Let’s face it: sex is innately funny. Body parts squishing together is always a recipe for potential awkwardness. So it’s only natural that Hollywood has mined the beast with two backs for comedy since the mid-­1950s. With Gigi getting her groove back on this week’s Gigi Does It, we thought we’d spotlight the 10 most hilariously awkward sex comedies ever lensed, from sci­fi parodies to touching teen romances.

10. Porky’s

Set in the 1950s, Bob Clark’s 1981 hit comedy follows a group of high school kids who want to lose their virginity, and travel to a nightclub in the Florida Everglades to do it. This kicks off a string of comical events that includes a “peeping on the girls locker room” scene that has been endlessly homaged and parodied. Porky’s was a massive critical flop on release, but thanks to VHS and cable airings it became a sweaty ’80s classic.

9. The Virginity Hit

The 2010 comedy The Virginity Hit takes the found­ footage approach from flicks like Paranormal Activity and transplants it into the much scarier world of high school sex and YouTube humiliation. This underrated movie laid the groundwork for a potential “third wave” of sex comedies.

8. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Woody Allen took a best­selling advice book and transformed it into this episodic comedy that cast a baleful eye on sex in the Free Love decade. The stellar cast (Gene Wilder! Burt Reynolds! Lynn Redgrave!) deliver some of the bits that rank among the best in Allen’s career. The rapid­-fire pace lets The Woodman touch on all manner of sexual deviancy, and the movie’s climax — in which the director plays a sperm getting ready to blast off into the throes of orgasm –­ is one of cinema’s most iconic moments.

7. Orgazmo

South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone have never shied away from getting explicit, and their NC­-17 sex comedy was an early taste of the duo’s outrageous humor. A young Mormon missionary comes to Los Angeles to try and save souls and winds up getting hired to star in a superhero-­themed porno. When his costar invents a ray gun that gives people orgasms, all Hell (and hilarity) breaks loose.

6. Superbad

This Judd Apatow-produced hit brought teen comedies into the age of the overshare with its mix of teenage awkwardness, uproarious gags and a healthy bromance between leads Michael Cera and Jonah Hill.

5. American Pie

The second great era of sex comedies kicked off in 1999 with this remarkably ribald ensenble flick about a quartet of friends trying to lose their virginity before they graduate high school. American Pie takes its name from the scene where Jason Biggs gets caught in a compromising position with some pastry, but the movie has multiple unforgettable bits, particularly Alyson Hannigan’s reverie about band camp.

4. There’s Something About Mary

The Farrelly Brothers cemented their position as a comedic powerhouse with this still hilarious Ben Stiller/Cameron Diaz rom com. Rarely has a film that involves testicular injury and unfortunate choices in hair gel been so sweet.

3. The 40-Year-Old Virgin

Judd Apatow proved that sex comedies aren’t just for teens with his breakthrough big screen comedy which cast Steve Carell as the titular middle-aged virgin. Although there’s plenty of erotic tomfoolery in this flick, it’s the real sense of heart and emotional consequence that makes it a classic.

2. The Girl Next Door

The normalization of pornography has drastically changed the way we think about sex, and 2004’s The Girl Next Door wrings tons of laughs from what happens when dirty movies hit a little too close to home. Elisha Cuthbert is the not-so-innocent girl next door who helps Emile Hirsch find new purpose in his life. A surprisingly dark and high-­quality outing for a film that was marketed as “American Porn.”

1. The Graduate

Single­-handedly responsible for introducing the concept of the “MILF” to American culture, Mike Nichols’ 1967 comedy features genre­-defining performances from Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft as a recent college graduate and the older woman he hooks up with. Sex is integral to The Graduate‘s plot and premise — it’s the fulcrum of the emotional conflict, not just thrown in for titillation, making for one of the best comedies of all time.

Donna That 70s Show

Donna Rules

Love Donna From That ’70s Show? Take the Quiz!

Catch That '70s Show Mons & Tues 6-11P on IFC.

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Photo credit: 20th Century Fox TV

Donna is the strongest (and probably the smartest) member of the That ’70s Show gang. But how well do you know the sassy redhead? Take the ultimate Donna fan quiz and find out!


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