DID YOU READ

Slow cinema backlash.

Slow cinema backlash. (photo)

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It was inevitable that someone would get around to complaining that the dominant mode of the arthouse film had become super-languorous master takes. Over at “Sight & Sound,” Nick James has periodically used his front-of-the-magazine editorials to rail against what he sees as the excesses of “Slow Cinema.” Now the debate has shifted to passionate unpaid online writers: Harry Tuttle was peeved, and then Steven Shaviro did a frankly better job of articulating the anti-slow cinema case than James did. His argument is simple but eloquent: if contemporary slow cinema is descended from Antonioni, Akerman and so on, their rigorous long takes were adventurous provocations created by extremists. In the modern slow cinema, boundaries aren’t getting pushed: people are operating within a recognized, default artistic idiom. That suggests people are missing out on the chance to push the medium forward (wherever “forward” might be located).

Here’s the problem: there are masters, and then there are imitators. The problem isn’t “slow cinema” per se, any more than the problem with purely narrative, story-oriented film is that it can be practiced by both, say, David Mamet and Steven Spielberg as well as Steve “Paul Blart” Carr. That doesn’t mean narrative is dead; that means some people do it better than others. But with narrative movies, your average viewer can draw upon a wider sample selection of the effectual and ineffectual. The rigors of arthouse films require more cunning and self-motivation to track down.

05122010_lourdes.jpgSo when you get a small sample size of more rigorous-type films, you can get disillusioned a lot faster. But the names being brought up with monotonous regularity as premiere disciples of slow cinema — Bela Tarr, Carlos Reygadas, Tsai Ming-Liang — are pretty much indisputably the very best at what they do. You may not care for a five-minute sunrise, nor long tracking shots of the back of someone’s head. And that’s totally understandable. But these filmmakers are almost objectively the premiere practitioners.

The problem isn’t the masters. It’s the second-tier wave of films that premiere at Berlin and smaller festivals, rarely get picked up for distribution, and simply stagnate in their own self-righteous slowness. Outside the festival circuit few will ever see them. But those that do instantly understand why someone would wish a pox upon the whole movement. Earlier this year, a few American cities were treated to one such specimen: Jessica Hausner’s “Lourdes.” This is a movie that really does feel like it’s slow because it doesn’t know any better: shots go on but they’re not particularly complicated. There are no visual riches worth taking in slowly and the drama fails to rise. The whole thing just feels dull. I have no idea how this got distribution; the sheer star power of Sylvie Testud?

That’s really what James is objecting to: movies that show up expecting to be hailed for their high seriousness without earning it first. And that’s fair, because it complies with the golden rule of art: 99% of everything is garbage. The problem isn’t the mode, it’s the average product. The exceptions are always what matter.

[Photos: “Red Desert,” The Criterion Collection, 1964; “Lourdes,” Palisades Tartan, 2009.]

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Car Notes

Portlandia On People Who Can’t Park

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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If flagrant bad parking takes nerve, then retaliatory note writing takes neuroses. Watch Fred and Carrie take passive aggression to next level in Car Notes, the new Portlandia web series presented by Subaru. The first episode is yours right here and now, and you can see every installment of Car Notes anytime online, on the IFC app and on demand.

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Nick Kroll and John Mulaney To Host Spirit Awards

The Spirit Awards Air February 25 LIVE on IFC.

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The 2017 Spirit Awards have finally found their frontmen: Nick Kroll and John Mulaney. And it’s no wonder. Just marvel in their splendid chemistry back when they appeared on Comedy Bang! Bang!:

The pair are prolific within the performing arts community: television (Kroll in The League and The Kroll Show, Mulaney as a writer of IFC’s own Documentary Now!), theater (including Broadway’s current Oh Hello Show), and stand-up comedy. In fact, it’s entirely possible that emceeing an awards show is one of the few remaining line items on their professional bucket lists.

It’s important to caveat this announcement, however. Unlike the bigger and more ubiquitously known awards shows, the Spirit Awards are not, well…boring. (We’re talking to you, Oscar.)

They’re funny. They’re honest. They have quality to match the red-carpet fanfare. And that’s alarmingly special. Last year’s show included some legitimately historic moments, like when transgender actress Mya Taylor won best supporting female, or Kate McKinnon’s hilarious and timely parody of Carol. See more highlights here to get the flavor of the Spirit Awards and read all about Film Independent to dig deeper.

The 2017 Spirit Awards air live February 25 at 5P ET exclusively on IFC.

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Ho Ho Ha

Xmas Miracles You’ll See At Joe’s Pub

Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special Premieres December 21 at 10P on IFC.

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It’s just so tempting to bah-humbug the holiday season. And while there’s much we can’t wait to put behind us, one thing left to look forward to with pure and wide-eyed joy is Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special, starring Tony Hale. It’s a celebration in the true spirit of those splendid TV specials from the ’70s and ’80s, complete with special guests, musical numbers, awkward segues and an (intentionally) wafer-thin narrative through line.

As if you need more convincing, here are a few juicy nuggets to get excited for…

Tony Hale plying the captive audience with hot chocolate (and it working).

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Bridget Everett dressed like an ornament…

and in a state of nearly constant wardrobe malfunction.
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Matteo Lane hitting a crazy high note in a Snuggie.

Not a Slanket. There’s a meaningful difference.

Lisa Loeb creeping on Kurt Vile.

#hairlikeapony #whynotme
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Judah Friedlander getting replaced by a robot…

and it pretty much going as expected.
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Bottom line: the miracles abound. Grinches, Scrooges, and Tiny Tims alike will find their Holiday joy. And it’ll be awkward–in the most wonderful kind of way.

Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special premieres Wednesday December 21 at 10p on IFC

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