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Review: “My Own Love Song” takes so many wrong turns it’s almost all right.

Review: “My Own Love Song” takes so many wrong turns it’s almost all right. (photo)

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Reviewed at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival.

One of my fondest memories of the Tribeca Film Festival involves the time I went to see “Tennessee,” the road trip drama in which Mariah Carey found her voice, literally and figuratively, and helped two lost souls find their way as well. It was an awful movie, but not in the fun way that the trio of friends sitting next to me had hoped, sneaking in a flask under one of their coats and making all sorts of snide comments about Carey before the film started. Unfortunately, the alcohol was more likely to put them to sleep rather than enhance their enjoyment of the film, which was a total bore.

It saddened me to think those guys probably weren’t at the premiere of “My Own Love Song,” which took essentially the exact same story and threw in scenes of animated flamingos and kingfishers, a batshit Forest Whitaker and Elias Koteas, and Nick Nolte serving up slices of a psychedelic chocolate cake. Sadly, these things overshadow Renee Zellweger’s first genuine performance in years as a wheelchair-bound singer who reluctantly travels down south to New Orleans when her mentally unstable pal (Whitaker) stumbles upon a letter from her son who she gave up for adoption.

The rosy glow that Zellweger once exuded has seemed to return, albeit under a thicket of brown hair and little makeup. It’s one of the rare examples of subtlety on the part of director Olivier Dahan (“Ma Vie En Rose”), who, like Wong Kar-wai and so many other foreign filmmakers, decided to make his English-language debut on a de Tocqueville-esque travelogue.

04232010_ZellwegerMyOwnLoveSong3.jpgIn some sense, it wouldn’t matter where “My Own Love Song” takes place, as Dahan explained during the post-screening Q & A how “it’s not a real realistic movie, it’s more about dreams,” but, like an early scene at the start of the film where Whitaker carries Zellweger into an ice cold lake during a day of fun in the sun, Dahan doesn’t ease us into the water.

We first meet Zellweger’s Jane Wyatt at a bar where she feigns interest in a farm machinery insurance agent who won’t take no for an answer — until she reveals her paralysis from behind a table. The first shot of Whitaker’s Joey has him laying flat in a parking lot as a galaxy of stars turns to asphalt. The pair are bonded by their shared trauma and add a third when a young married woman named Billie (Madeline Zima) shares a bus ride with them and explains how her husband has disappeared.

All three are looking for something, but in setting up tangible goals for each of the characters, Dahan makes a film that’s utterly adrift when it comes to a coherent narrative. For instance, don’t ask for the specifics when the trio is lured into Nolte’s cabin in the woods of Cairo, Mississippi by a guitar riff and then listen patiently as he recounts how Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil in Clarksdale to play the blues, complete with a reenactment. Also, it’s best not to wonder why Zellweger is suddenly able to sing a stirring rendition of “This Land is Your Land” after years of refusing such requests (though the moment gives an idea of what she might’ve done had she played Janis Joplin, as was once planned).

04232010_WhitakerMyOwnLoveSong.jpgTo be fair, “My Own Love Song” couldn’t be anywhere near as bad as it is without being as ambitious as it is. The film features original music from Bob Dylan (I counted four of a reported 16 new songs composed specifically for the film), and frequent Spike Lee and Darren Aronofsky cinematographer Matthew Libatique rarely stops using a steadicam — there’s a car chase in the film that is almost breathtaking between its constant movement and Dahan’s use of split-screens, until it gets confusing and ultimately frustrating.

You could also use those adjectives to describe Whitaker’s performance of the schizophrenic Joey; like Nicolas Cage, you can always count on Whitaker’s commitment to character, but you never know when you’re going to get “The Last King of Scotland” or something like this, which borders on parody with all of Joey’s strange tics and a half-baked romance that develops between he and Billie.

After the film’s international premiere at Tribeca, Dahan was warmly received by the minority of the audience that stayed, with those using their questions to praise the director for the dreamlike quality he brought to the film, which is why Zellweger’s Sarah may sum up the film’s appeal best when she asks during her wistful narration, “Should I believe or should I disappear?” The answer may be the former for some, but as the festival walkouts testified, the latter for most.

“My Own Love Song” is currently without U.S. distribution.

[Photos: “My Own Love Song,” Légende Films, 2010]

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Culture Vulture

IFC Teams Up With Vulture.com to Develop New Pop Culture Series

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Photo Credit: New York Magazine

The pop culture aficionados at Vulture.com are teaming up with IFC to develop a brand new unscripted series. The Vulture Show will deliver smart, irreverent and ‘slightly off’ entertainment news, covering TV, movies, music, art, books, theater and celebrities with the outlet’s signature, sharp perspective.

“IFC has found the perfect pop culture accomplice with New York Magazine’s Vulture,” said Christine Lubrano, SVP, Original Programming, IFC. “We look forward to developing a show that provides our viewers with a sophisticated and humorous first-look at all things entertainment before it’s the news everyone is buzzing about.”

“It’s fitting that we bring Vulture to TV with IFC, whose offbeat sensibility matches our own,” said Adam Moss, Editor-in-Chief, New York Magazine. “We’ve had a tremendous response to our Vulture Festival events, and are excited for this next incarnation of Vulture.”

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Marc Maron – Maron – Season 4, Episode 5

Life Goals

10 Maron Quotes to Get You Through the Week

Get over the Wednesday hump with a brand new Maron tonight at 9P.

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Wednesdays are tough. You’re halfway through the week, but there’s still half of the week left. Luckily Wednesdays mean brand new Maron, with yet another chance to gain some much needed wisdom from Marc Maron. This week Marc continues to dig himself out of his own personal hell, making us all wiser in the process. Before you catch tonight’s Maron, check out some Marc quotes to get you over “Hump Day.”

1. Set realistic diet goals.

Whipped Cream Maron

Instead of looking up how many calories you have left for today’s nutritional intake, admit that you just want something of the whipped and creamy variety.


2. Assert yourself into the conversation.

Maron Shut Up

Instead of letting people walk all over you, be like Marc and demand to be heard…even if it’s just to tell someone to shut up.


3. Trust no one. Except Marc.

"Maron

Instead of trying to figure out which friend could keep a secret, admit that you yourself couldn’t keep a secret to save your life.


4. Minimize your shortcomings.

Maron Notes

Instead of blaming the world for your failures, admit when it’s your own damned fault…to a point.


5. Celebrate accomplishments. Even minor ones.

Maron Ahole

Instead of wishing for greater success, take pride in the ways that you have excelled without judgment.


6. Remember that every day is filled with potential.

Maron Possibilities

Just make sure you have enough coffee.


7. Demand proof from others.

Maron Believe

Instead of potentially being in someone’s shadow, throw doubt on anything they haven’t properly documented.


8. Take a moment to reflect.

Maron Right Thing

There’s a first time for everything.


9. Be honest about where you’re at right now.

Maron Smart

Instead of avoiding embarrassment, embrace it.


10. And finally, remember the important things in life.

Maron Love

Instead of bemoaning the inadequacies of your relationships, perhaps due in part to items 1 through 9, just focus on the physical.

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Marc Maron – Maron – Season 4, Episode 4

Behind the Anger

Marc Maron Gets Deep in an Interview with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross

Follow Marc's journey to recovery tonight at 9P on IFC.

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It ain’t no stage persona: Marc Maron is an anxious, angry, complicated fellow. In a recent interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air, the Maron star described how he’s beset by constant anxiety, self-hatred, and general unease, which he considers his “uncomfortable” comfort zone. “Being sort of anxious and uncomfortable has really been my home base, innately,” he said. “And I don’t know how to change that, and that’s really the challenge for me now.”

A former addict himself, Marc also discussed the difficulty of portraying his TV character’s drug relapse, downfall, and rehabilitation — a fear he’s glad “happened in fiction and not in real life.”

Click here to listen to Marc Maron’s deep and revealing interview with NPR’s Terry Gross on Fresh Air.

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