Oscars 2010: The armed forces vs the alien insurgents.

Oscars 2010: The armed forces vs the alien insurgents. (photo)

Posted by on

Despite the early buzz around “Precious” and the timely subject matter of “Up in the Air,” it’s looking more and more like this year’s Oscar race is going to come down to a battle of the exes, of the alien insurgents versus the armed forces, the most expensive film ever made against a particularly well-funded indie.

The Academy Awards are going to war, and it’s “Avatar” versus “The Hurt Locker” with nine nominations each — unless, of course, “The Blind Side” sneaks in and steals the win. It wouldn’t surprise me — with this year’s ten film Best Picture race, there’s a feeling that anything goes.

Best Picture
“The Blind Side”
“District 9”
“An Education”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“A Serious Man”
“Up in the Air”

Best Director
Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker”
James Cameron, “Avatar”
Lee Daniels, “Precious”
Jason Reitman, “Up in the Air”
Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Actor
Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”
George Clooney, “Up in the Air”
Colin Firth, “A Single Man”
Morgan Freeman, “Invictus”
Jeremy Renner, “The Hurt Locker”

02022010_theblindside.jpgBest Actress
Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”
Helen Mirren, “The Last Station”
Carey Mulligan, “An Education”
Gabourey Sidibe, “Precious”
Meryl Streep, “Julie & Julia”

Best Supporting Actor
Matt Damon, “Invictus”
Woody Harrelson, “The Messenger”
Christopher Plummer, “The Last Station”
Stanley Tucci, “The Lovely Bones”
Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”

Best Supporting Actress
Penelope Cruz, “Nine”
Vera Farmiga, “Up in the Air”
Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Crazy Heart”
Anna Kendrick, “Up in the Air”
Mo’Nique, “Precious”

Best Animated Feature Film
“Fantastic Mr. Fox”
“The Princess and the Frog”
“The Secret of Kells”

Best Foreign Film
Argentina, “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” Juan Jose Campanella, director
Israel, “Ajami,” Scandar Copti and Yaron Shani, directors
Peru, “The Milk of Sorrow,” Claudia Llosa, director
France, “Un Prophète,” Jacques Audiard, director
Germany, “The White Ribbon,” Michael Haneke, director

Best Original Screenplay
Mark Boal, “The Hurt Locker”
Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”
Alessandro Camon and Oren Moverman, “The Messenger”
Joel and Ethan Coen, “A Serious Man”
Pete Docter and Bob Peterson, “Up”

Best Adapted Screenplay
Neill Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell, “District 9”
Nick Hornby, “An Education”
Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci and Tony Roche, “In the Loop”
Geoffrey Fletcher, “Precious”
Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner, “Up in the Air”

Best Documentary Feature
“Burma VJ”
“The Cove”
“Food, Inc”
“The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers”
“Which Way Home”

05202009_inglouriousbasterds.jpgBest Cinematography
Mauro Fiore, “Avatar”
Bruno Delbonnel, “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”
Barry Ackroyd, “The Hurt Locker”
Robert Richardson, “Inglourious Basterds”
Christian Berger, “The White Ribbon”

Best Film Editing
Stephen Rivkin, John Refoua and James Cameron, “Avatar”
Julian Clarke, “District 9”
Bob Murawski and Chris Innis, “The Hurt Locker”
Sally Menke, “Inglourious Basterds”
Joe Klotz, “Precious”

Best Original Score
James Horner, “Avatar”
Alexandre Desplat, “Fantastic Mr. Fox”
Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders, “The Hurt Locker”
Hans Zimmer, “Sherlock Holmes”
Michael Giacchino, “Up”

Best Original Song
“Almost There,” music and lyrics by Randy Newman, from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Down in New Orleans,” music and lyrics by Randy Newman, from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Loin de Paname,” music by Reinhardt Wagner, lyrics by Frank Thomas, from “Paris 36”
“Take It All,” music and lyrics by Maury Yeston, from “Nine”
“The Weary Kind (Theme from Crazy Heart),” music and lyrics by Ryan Bingham and T-Bone Burnett, from “Crazy Heart”

Best Costume Design
Janet Patterson, “Bright Star”
Catherine Leterrier, “Coco Before Chanel”
Monique Prudhomme, “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus”
Colleen Atwood, “Nine”
Sandy Powell, “The Young Victoria”

Best Art Direction
Rick Carter and Robert Stromberg for art direction, Kim Sinclair for set decoration, “Avatar”
Dave Warren and Anastasia Masaro for art direction, Caroline Smith for set decoration, “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus”
John Myhre for art direction, Gordon Sim for set direction, “Nine”
Sarah Greenwood for art direction, Katie Spencer for set direction, “Sherlock Holmes”
Patrice Vermette for art direction, Maggie Gray for set direction, “The Young Victoria”

Best Visual Effects
Joe Letteri, Stephen Rosenbaum, Richard Baneham and Andrew R. Jones, “Avatar”
Dan Kaufman, Peter Muyzers, Robert Habros and Matt Aitken, “District 9”
Roger Guyett, Russell Earl, Paul Kavanagh and Burt Dalton, “Star Trek”

Best Makeup
Aldo Signoretti and Vittorio Sodano, “Il Divo”
Barney Burman, Mindy Hall and Joel Harlow, “Star Trek”
Jon Henry Gordon and Jenny Shircore, “The Young Victoria”

05132009_up.jpgBest Sound Editing
Christopher Boyes and Gwendolyn Yates Whittle, “Avatar”
Paul N.J. Ottosson, “The Hurt Locker”
Wylie Stateman, “Inglourious Basterds”
Mark Stoeckinger and Alan Rankin, “Star Trek”
Michael Silvers and Tom Myers, “Up”

Best Sound Mixing
Christopher Boyes, Gary Summers, Andy Nelson and Tony Johnson, “Avatar”
Paul N.J. Ottosson and Ray Beckett, “The Hurt Locker”
Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti and Mark Ulano, “Inglourious Basterds”
Anna Behlmer, Andy Nelson and Peter J. Devlin, “Star Trek”
Greg P. Russell, Gary Summers and Geoffrey Patterson, “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen”

Best Documentary Short
“China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province”
“The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner”
“The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant”
“Music By Prudence”
“Rabbit à la Berlin”

Best Animated Short
“French Roast”
“Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty”
“The Lady and the Reaper (La Dama y la Muerte”)
“A Matter of Loaf and Death”

02022010_thedoor1.jpgBest Live-Action Short
“The Door”
“Instead of Abracadabra”
“Miracle Fish”
“The New Tenants”

[Photos: Cameron on the set of “Avatar,” Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, 2009/Bigelow on the set of “The Hurt Locker,” Summit, 2009; “The Blind Side,” Warner Bros. Pictures, 2009; “The White Ribbon,” Sony Pictures Classics, 2009; “Inglourious Basterds,” Weinstein Company, 2009; “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus,” Sony Pictures Classics, 2009; “Up,” Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, 2009; “The Door,” Octagon Films, 2008]

Watch More
Documentary Now! Robert Evans Mansion

The Reel Deal

Everything You Need To Know About “Mr. Runner Up” Inspiration Robert Evans

Watch the two-part finale of Documentary Now! this Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Collection

In its upcoming two-part finale, Documentary Now! spoofs the crown jewel of docs: The Kid Stays In The Picture. It’s the autobiographical documentary about Robert Evans, the unlikely Hollywood mogul whose mix of self-aggrandizing bravado, classic good looks and extremely circumstantial good luck took him from being a salesman to an actor to the head of Paramount Pictures.

If you’ve never seen the film, it’s totally worth it. Rotten Tomatoes agrees, with a staggeringly-high approval rating. Watch it before, or watch it after — doesn’t matter. You’ll appreciate it whenever.

In the meantime, here’s a bit of background that will come in handy…

Robert Loves Robert

Robert Evans desk

USA Films/Everett Collection

Robert Evans is the ultimate Robert Evans fan. The movie was written, produced, directed and narrated by Robert Evans. It is totally unbiased.

He’s Kind Of A Big Deal

Robert Evans, Chinatown
Paramount Pictures

Evans produced some of Hollywood’s true classics: Chinatown, Rosemary’s Baby, The Godfather, Love Story…the list goes on. Totally legit and amazing movies.

He’s Also Kind Of A Joke

Wag The Dog
New Line Cinema

Evans has been parodied in TV shows and movies like Entourage and Wag The Dog. He is the quintessential “producer” you already have in your head.

So Wrong He’s Right

Robert Evans Slap
20th Century Film Corp

Robert Evans is a notorious narcissist whose love of self is so blind and sincere that it’s actually adorable.

There’s Something Missing

via Giphy

Entire sections of Robert Evans’ life are left out of the documentary. Maybe it’s because of timing. Maybe it’s because real life isn’t a tidy narrative. Who knows.

He Blew It

Spider coke

Evans had a pretty spectacular fall from grace. He was convicted of cocaine trafficking in the early 80’s, and was connected to a contract killing during the production of The Cotton Club. Oops.

Losing Is For Losers

Everett Collection
Everett Collection

In the Robert Evans mythology, all tragedies are just triumphs in disguise, and every story has a happy ending…for Robert Evans.

Bill Hader Jerry Wallach

With these simple facts in hand you are now prepared to thoroughly enjoy the two-part finale of Documentary Now! starting this Wednesday at 10/9c on IFC.

Watch More

Weird Roles

Anthony Michael Hall’s Most Rotten Movies

Catch Anthony Michael Hall in Weird Science on Friday at 8P on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Universal/Everett Collection

Anthony Michael Hall was the quintessential ’80s nerd. We love him in classics like The Breakfast Club and National Lampoon’s Vacation. But even the brainiest among us has his weak spots. In honor of Weird Science airing this Rotten Friday, we analyze Hall’s worst movies.

Weird Science (1985) 56%

A low point for John Hughes, Weird Science is way too wacky for its own good. Anthony Michael Hall’s Gary and his pal Wyatt (Ilan Mitchell-Smith) create the “perfect woman.” Supernatural chaos ensues. The film costars a young Bill Paxton, floppy disks, and a general disconnect from all reality.

The Caveman’s Valentine (2001) 46%

This ambitious drama starring Samuel L. Jackson couldn’t live up to its rich premise. Jackson plays Romulus, a Juilliard-educated, paranoid schizophrenic who lives in a cave. Hall co-stars as Bob, a rich man, who wants to see Romulus play the piano. The plot centers around Romulus investigating a murder, but with so much going on, the movie never quite finds its rhythm.

All About the Benjamins (2002) 30%

Ice Cube plays a bounty hunter who teams up with Mike Epps’ con man to catch diamond thieves. Hall plays Lil J, a small-time drug dealer. It’s definitely a role we’ve never seen Hall in, but overall the movie isn’t funny or original enough to justify its violence.

Freddy Got Fingered (2001) 11%

This showcase for Tom Green’s goofy gross-out comedy is often hailed as one of the worst films of all time. Green plays Gord, a 20-something slacker, who dreams of having his own animated series. Hall is Dave Davidson, a CEO of an animation studio who eventually helps Gord find success. Too bad Tom Green wasn’t so lucky.

Johnny Be Good (1988) 0%

Hall plays against type as Johnny Walker, a star quarterback. Robert Downey Jr. is his best friend and Uma Thurman plays his devoted girlfriend. Despite the support of a future A-list cast, the movie lacks central conflict and charm. Or, as TV Guide put it, “Johnny be worthless.” Ouch.

Catch the “Too Rotten to Miss” Weird Science this Friday at 8P on IFC.

Watch More
Season 6: Episode 1: Pickathon

Binge Fest

Portlandia Season 6 Now Available On DVD

The perfect addition to your locally-sourced, artisanal DVD collection.

Posted by on

End of summer got you feeling like:

Portlandia Toni Screaming GIF

Ease into fall with Portlandia‘s sixth season. Relive the latest exploits of Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein’s cast of characters, including Doug and Claire’s poignant breakup, Lance’s foray into intellectual society, and the terrifying rampage of a tsukemen Noodle Monster! Plus, guest stars The Flaming Lips, Glenn Danzig, Louis C.K., Kevin Corrigan, Zoë Kravitz, and more stop by to experience what Portlandia is all about.

Pick up a copy of the DVD today, or watch full episodes and series extras now on IFC.com and the IFC app.

Watch More
Powered by ZergNet