DID YOU READ

Ranting in Pictures

Ranting in Pictures (photo)

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“‘Star Wars: The Phantom Menace’ was the most disappointing thing since my son.”

That’s the daffy opening line of filmmaker Mike Stoklasa’s “‘Star Wars: The Phantom Menace’ Review,” an insightful, rudely funny takedown of George Lucas’ prequel. And it’s as good a place as any to start an appreciation of a hybrid of the video essay and the mash-up — an emerging format that’s often more entertaining than the work it cannibalizes.

Let’s start by distinguishing straightforward mash-ups and video essays from works created by Stoklasa and his siblings-in-spirit. The term “mash-up” was first applied to musical works that combined existing pieces of recording music in order to create something new. The YouTube equivalent is defined by Wikipedia as a work that “combines “multiple sources of video — which often have no relation to each other — into a derivative work, often lampooning its component sources or another text.” (Examples include those now-ubiquitous clips in which somebody puts, say, Joe Pesci’s “Funny how?” monologue from “Goodfellas” into the mouth of Elmo, or turns Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” into a heartwarming family comedy with music cues by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman.)

Video essays, on the other hand, tend to be more straightforwardly analytical: criticism in pictures. Their theatrical forerunner is the “essay film,” a ruminative, often first person nonfiction format practiced by Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Werner Herzog, Ross McElwee, Chantal Akerman and Agnès Varda, among other notable directors. Some of the more striking examples concentrate on film history and theory: Mark Rappaport’s documentary-drama hybrids, for instance, and Thom Andersen’s film and architecture meditation “Los Angeles Plays Itself.”

In the YouTube age, the video essay evolved into film criticism written with pictures. The format’s digital-era pioneer is my colleague and occasional collaborator Kevin B. Lee, whose analytical/historical pieces inspired me to do my own video essays for The L Magazine and Moving Image Source. Other committed practitioners include Eric Faden, Jim Emerson, Christian Keathley; Ben Sampson, who’s done superb breakdowns of “A.I.” and “F for Fake”, and Sophie Fiennes, who put Slovenian philosopher and psychoanalyst Slavoj Žižek at the center of “A Pervert’s Guide to Cinema.”

But while the terms “mash-up” and “video essay” cover a fair bit of ground, they don’t capture the peculiar intensity of the hybrid filmmakers I’m spotlighting here.

01202010_thx.jpgThe best work by my colleague Steven Boone, for instance, evades such labels the way The Flash ducks bullets. His pieces always have a critical purpose, and sometimes Boone foregrounds it — as in the plainly titled “Low-Budget Eye Candy #1”, which annotates a chase scene from George Lucas’ 1971 debut “THX 1138” to show how a clever director can make a cheap film look pricey.

But other Boone essays are more confounding and poetic. They combine movie scenes, news clips, pop music cues, on-screen text and voiceover narration to create stylish shorts that can be enjoyed as both digital-era criticism and freestanding art. Boone’s “Wolf City High and Low” for example, doesn’t just quote “Woodstock” director Michael Wadleigh’s 1981 horror flick “Wolfen,” about Native American werewolf spirits stalking 20th century New Yorkers; it stirs Ennio Morricone’s score for “Violent City” (1970) and audio from local TV news reports into the mix, sketching 21st century New York as a hellhole in which the rich treat the poor like animals.

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Comedy Bang Bang 7th Anniversary

7 Years in Heaven

Comedy Bang! Bang! Podcast Celebrates 7 Years With Fan Favorite Guests

Comedy Bang! Bang! returns to IFC with back-to-back episodes on Friday, June 3rd at 11P.

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Earwolf

It’s been (Barenaked Ladies style) seven years since Comedy Bang! Bang! premiered on Southern California’s Indie 103 radio station as a music and variety show, then known as Comedy Death-Ray. And in those seven years, host Scott Aukerman has evolved the radio show into a podcast, a TV series, and a comedy mainstay for fans of surreal, offbeat humor. To celebrate the special occasion, Scott invited fan favorites Jason Mantzoukas, Horatio Sanz and Paul F. Tompkins, as well as a slew of popular characters and segments, to CB!B!’s 7th Anniversary Show.

Click here to listen to the 7th anniversary show on Earwolf. And just a reminder, Comedy Bang! Bang! returns to IFC for a fifth season on June 3rd with back-to-back episodes on Fridays at 11P ET/PT and 11:30P ET/PT. Season Five will feature “Weird Al” Yankovic as the new bandleader and a bevy of guests like Kevin Bacon, Kristen Schaal, Tony Hale, Aubrey Plaza, T-Pain, and more.

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That 70s Show Cast Reunion

Hangin' Out

That ’70s Show Reunion Photo Proves the Kids Are Still Alright

Catch That '70s Show Mondays & Tuesdays starting at 6P on IFC.

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Laura Prepon / Instagram

The stars of That ’70s Show had their own throwback reunion as Fez, Jackie, Kelso, Donna, and Hyde recently got back together for a candid on-set photo. Posted to Laura Prepon‘s Instagram account, actors Wilmer Valderrama, Mila Kunis, Ashton Kutcher, Danny Masterson, and Prepon posed on the set of Netflix’s The Ranch — which stars Kutcher and Masterson as brothers who manage their family ranch. Older and wiser but no less striking, the cast seems to have weathered the ’80s (and the ’00s) very well.

Keeping this from being a complete That ’70s Show reunion is Topher Grace’s absence, but this photo works as a reunion of the cast from the post-Eric final season. With The Ranch renewed for a second season, we could be seeing more ’70s reunion moments. Maybe Tommy Chong will stop by?

Family #that70sshow 💓💓

A photo posted by Laura Prepon (@lauraprepon) on

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IFC_PROMOS_SHARK_OVERVIEW_wBUG_FINAL_FOR_DIGITAL-H264_1920x1080_677720131779

Fin Facts

Jason Alexander Is IFC’s Shark Expert For the Memorial Day Shark Half-a-Day Marathon

Catch IFC's Shark Half-a-Day marathon this Memorial Day starting at 6A.

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As we approach beach season, it’s important to remember some safety tips for dealing with our bloodthirsty friends from the deep. For instance, did you know there’s a breed of shark whose diet consists entirely of helicopters?

To celebrate IFC’s Memorial Day “Shark Half-a-Day,” a tasty, binge-worthy 12 hours or-so block (who needs an entire week?) airing of all of the Jaws franchise films, IFC’s “sharks-pert” Jason Alexander is sharing his possibly-not-entirely-accurate knowledge in all-new IFC promos. Who knew Jason was our nation’s foremost expert on shark-related trivia?

Check out some “fin facts” below, and be sure to catch the “Shark Half-a-Day” Memorial Day marathon on Monday, May 30th starting at 6AM. (See below for a complete movie rundown.)

Shark Half-A-Day: Monday, May 30th starting @ 6am
Jaws
Jaws 2
Jaws 3-D
Jaws: The Revenge

Additional Jaws marathons:
Thursday, May 5th starting @ 8pm
Friday, May 20th starting @ 8pm

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