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Best soundtracks of the decade

Best soundtracks of the decade (photo)

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This past decade has been awash in both great and terrible soundtracks, with a preponderance of directors who have great musical taste but often apply it too liberally to their films. The music video, long fallen from prominence on TV, seems to have found it’s place on the big screen, with scenes written around songs now part of a formula. This isn’t always a bad thing, and some of the finest moments in film cannot be separated from the songs that accompany them. Some even become forever inseparable.

The more gratuitous examples are tiresome, even offensive. Some directors don’t know how to build a scene or earn the right to employ the song — they just slap it in there because it seems cool. In many cases the indispensable music supervisor did it for them. A best of list for the decade is sure to include some of these lesser moments but I’ve assembled a list of films whose soundtracks have risen above the pack. Keep in mind, this is not about films scores which is another beast entirely.

1. “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001)

I often think of Wes Anderson as the biggest asshole I’ve never met. Film after film, he (along with his music supe Randall Poster) selfishly claims more of the best songs ever written as his own. There they are, burned forever into his films, greats by The Rolling Stones, Nico, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Velvet Underground. He’s often the first to use them and, even when someone already has, he tends to do it better. Genius you can be jealous of. I’ve grown a bit tired of the constant song barrage he employs but glance back with me to “The Royal Tenenbaums,” before all was overplayed out. That moment with Margot coming off the bus… it still almost makes me weep, it’s so beautiful. Elliot Smith too.

2. “Adventureland” (2009)

Greg Mottola’s ’80s amusement park/graduate love story has not yet had the chance to stand the test of time, but it will. Hands down the best soundtrack of 2009 and possibly the best use of The Velvet Underground in the history of film. Even Falco’s “Rock Me Amadeus” was a good time.

3. “Children of Men” (2006)

It’s hard to stand back and separate a great soundtrack from a great film, and it may be that this is so high on the list because I’m swayed by the quality of Alfonso Cuarón’s filmmaking, Michael Caine and Deep Purple. Add some Donovan, Radiohead, Lennon, that wispy Franco Battiato “Ruby Tuesday” cover and King Crimson and I think you have one of the most bad-ass soundtracks of the Naughts.

4. “Breakfast on Pluto” (2005)

I was so smitten with Kitten that I had to check myself when I left the theater after seeing this Neil Jordan fun fest. You know, whistle at a couple broads on the street on my way to give my girlfriend a pearl necklace. I was even more impressed with the songcraft of Harry Nilsson, Dusty Springfield and T-Rex. Not the first time, “Children of the Revolution” was employed (see “Billy Elliot” and “Dogtown and Z-Boys”), but it was tough as nails — painted ones of course.

5. “24 Hour Party People” (2002)

If you’re a huge Joy Division fan (I am) or lover of New Order (less so) you might have had to see this film multiple times. It doesn’t necessarily live or die as a film because of the bands — it’s a great story about a moment in time in Manchester, and Steve Coogan is particularly hilarious — but the bands are why this soundtrack kicks ass.

6. “High Fidelity” (2000)

If only we still had the mix tape. John Cusack’s damaged record store owner was a dying breed then and only a memory now. This film, while lacking some of the flavor of the book, makes up for it in the music. Love, Smog, 13th Floor Elevators, The Velvet Underground, Stereolab, even the now forgotten Beta Band.

7. “Almost famous” (2000)

Cameron Crowe’s semi-autobiographical fantasy about his experience as a teenage writer for Rolling Stone is pretty much mandatory for this list. Whatever you think of the film now, the soundtrack brilliantly captured the sound and feeling of the zany trip everyone was on in the early ’70s. Remember the fun/lame Elton John sing along? Cat Stevens, Led Zeppelin, Simon and Garfunkel’s “America” seals it.

8. “Juno” (2007)

Dominated by Kimya Dawson/The Moldy Peaches, this soundtrack still has some variety in Astrud Gilberto, The Kinks and Sonic Youth. What’s more, Michael Cera and Ellen Page’s cover of “Anyone Else But You” is entirely endearing.

9. “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” (2001)

I would never have thought I’d be so pleased with a musical film about an East German transgendered Bowie wannabe (who lost his johnson) on tour with his weird glam band. Composer Stephen Trask wrote all the songs for the stage musical on which the film is based, and likewise the soundtrack is all Trask (aside from a bit of “Walk on the Wild Side,” there’s little other music in the film). I never got so fired up about it that I bought the soundtrack, but the achievement and execution deserves serious recognition.

10 / 0. “Watchmen” (2009)

Lastly, Zack Snyder’s Watchmen deserves some special top ten consideration. Think of this less as number 10 and maybe more number 0. It’s rare that a film employs a repertoire of such weighty songs and so many of them so badly. Snyder doesn’t earn half of the songs he uses — “The Sound of Silence,” are you kidding me? — and he basically rapes Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” As confounding and tasteless as it is used, the soundtrack alone is fantastic. The Phillip Glass song worked wonders and the revisionist history opening credits, set to “The Times They Are A-Changin,” are magic.

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Inauguration Alternative

Bill Murray On Repeat

It's a movie "Murray-thon" all-day Friday on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection, GIFs courtesy of GIPHY

Democrats, Republicans and Millennials agree: 2017 is shaping up to be a spectacle — a spectacle that really kicks into high gear this Friday with the presidential inauguration. Not only will the new POTUS swear in, but all the Country’s highest offices will be filled. It’s a daunting prospect, and to feel a little anxious about it is only normal. But if your anxiety is snowballing into panic, we have a solution:
Bill Murray.

He’s the human embodiment of a mental “Happy Place”, and there’s really no problem he can’t solve. So, with that in mind, how about we all set aside reality for a moment and let Bill take the pain away by imagining a top-shelf White House cabinet filled exclusively by his signature characters. Here are a few hypothetical appointments for your consideration…

Secretary of Defense:
Bill Murray from Stripes

His incompetence is balanced by charm, and dumb luck is inexplicably on his side. America could do worse.

Secretary of State:
Bill Murray from Lost In Translation

A seasoned globetrotter steeped in regional traditions who has the respect of the whole wide world. And he kills Costello in karaoke, which is very important.

Press Secretary:
Bill Murray from Ghostbusters

“Cats and dogs, living together. Mass hysteria.” Dude knows how to brief a room.

Secretary of Health and Human Services:
Bill Murray from What About Bob.

A doctor-approved people person who knows that progress is measured in baby steps.

Secretary of Energy:
Bill Murray from Groundhog Day

Let’s be honest, this world is going to need a lot of do-overs.

Feeling better? Hold on to that bliss. And enjoy a healthy alternative to the inauguration brouhaha with multiple Murrays all Friday long in an IFC movie marathon including Kingpin, Zombieland, Ghostbusters, and Ghostbusters II.

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Home Run

Hank Azaria Gets Thrown A Curve Ball

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Unless you’ve somehow missed every episode of the Simpsons since 1989, then surely you know that Hank Azaria is one of the most important character actors of our time. He’s so prolific and his voice is so dynamic that he’s responsible for more iconic personalities than most folks realize. Basically, he’s the great and powerful Oz — except that when you pull back the curtain the truth is actually more impressive. And now Hank is coming to IFC to bring yet another character to the TV pop culture hive mind in the new series Brockmire. Check out the trailer below.

Based on the following Funny or Die short and co-starring Amanda Peet, Brockmire follows the story of imploded major league sportscaster Jim Brockmire as he tries to resurrect his career by calling plays for a floundering minor league team in a podunk town.

The series is written by Joel Church-Cooper (Undateable) and produced by Funny or Die’s Mike Farah and Joe Farrell, meaning that there’s funny in front of the camera, funny behind the camera–funny all around. Sounds like a ball to us.

Brockmire premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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Car Notes

Portlandia On People Who Can’t Park

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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If flagrant bad parking takes nerve, then retaliatory note writing takes neuroses. Watch Fred and Carrie take passive aggression to next level in Car Notes, the new Portlandia web series presented by Subaru. The first episode is yours right here and now, and you can see every installment of Car Notes anytime online, on the IFC app and on demand.

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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