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Michael Shannon on “The Missing Person”

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01222009_themissingperson1.jpgMichael Shannon was nominated for an Oscar today for his superb supporting role in Sam Mendes’ otherwise glossily imperfect period drama “Revolutionary Road,” so the world’s about to be paying him a lot of well-deserved attention. But if you’ve seen him act before, on the screen or on stage, you’ve already noticed him. Shannon’s established himself in the past few years as the guy who can walk away with a film under the noses of established stars — see “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead,” see the aforementioned Mendes film, or better yet, see the edgier lead roles he’s taken in indies like “Bug,” “Shotgun Stories” or “The Missing Person,” which had its premiere at Sundance this year. Directed by Noah Buschel, the film finds Shannon playing John Rosow, a private eye in the most noir tradition who’s hired to follow a man who turns out to have been reported dead during the September 11th attacks. Delving into this mystery forces Rosow to confront his own trauma related to the attacks, and to return to the city he’d tried to leave behind. I sat down with Shannon in Park City on Monday to talk about the film, New York and his award chances.

How did you get involved with “The Missing Person”? What did you like about it?

I’m friends with Amy Ryan, and she was in a film that Noah made called “Cassady,” about Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac. One afternoon, me and Amy were having coffee, just shooting the breeze and she said, “I gotta go. I was in this movie and the director wants me to see a cut of it. You could probably come, if you wanted.” I like the subject, because I guess all boys have a fantasy about being Jack Kerouac, so I went and saw it on a little editing bay and thought it was incredible, one of the best movies I’d seen in a long time. Neal was having a reading of the screenplay of “The Missing Person,” and he asked me if I would just do it. It was a lot of fun, and a couple months later, he’s like, “Well, I think we’re going to make the movie. You want to do it?”

Did you model John Rosow on the classic noir detectives? There seems to be a lot of that in him, from his suits to his gin-drinking to his ability to take whacks on the head without apparent brain damage.

01222009_themissingperson2.jpgA lot of it was from the outside in — originally in the script, John’s hair is white, so a big point of contention for a long time was about how we were going to turn my hair white, because it’s basically impossible. Even if you pour Clorox all over your head, it still only gets platinum blond. I got the spray-on stuff, and that just looks silly. It was poetic and whatever, but I said “I don’t think it’s going to work.” So we went to a salon in the East Village and there’s this person who makes $200 to cut somebody’s hair standing there, she’s like, “So what do you want?” And [Noah say], “I want Steve McQueen.” As she’s cutting my hair, I’m looking in the mirror, and started the whole process for me. When I had the haircut and I had the suit, it just clicked. I didn’t go out cruising around with detectives. I know this is probably frustrating to hear because it’s not very enlightening, but I usually find most of the inspiration is just in the writing of the script — that’s one of the reasons I wanted to do [“The Missing Person”], the script was so freakin’ good, you’d have to be a moron to mess it up.

A lot of people say “Oh, you’re like Elliott Gould in ‘The Long Goodbye.'” I’m like “I’ve never seen ‘The Long Goodbye,’ but that’s great.” It was very low budget and there were no amenities, as it were, so after 10 hours of sitting around smoking cigarettes, you get to that point naturally.

How stylized would you say John is? I was actually going to be one of those people to bring up Elliott Gould, because they do seem awfully similar — John doesn’t seem to know about cell phones that can take pictures, for instance, he seems a little out of time and place.

The thing about the character that’s revealed throughout the course of the movie is that he’s not so much a detective as he is…I know this is going to sound corny as hell, but he is the missing person. To me, the whole beginning of the story… it’s almost like he could be dreaming this whole thing, that he’s really just some drunk laying in his bed imagining that he’s a detective. Obviously, he’s desperately searching for something to fill the gigantic hole in his heart, [because] his wife worked at the World Trade Center and died there. The style of it is for me is very much like this could possibly all be an illusion to begin with.

01222009_themissingperson3.jpg9/11 has worked its way indirectly into a lot of films, but there still aren’t many that have taken it on directly. You’ve acted in two of the ones I can think of — “The Missing Person” and “World Trade Center.” What’s your opinion on those who’ve made the claim that it’s too soon to deal with it on film?

To me, that’s insulting to the passage of time. To say that Vietnam is more palatable now because it was a few decades ago is just as distasteful to me as saying that something isn’t palatable because it just happened yesterday. These things will always be tragedies. I was just at Machu Picchu in Peru and there were all these people walking around in little tour groups with their guides, taking pictures and looking at the mountains, and I just kept thinking [the Incas] met the most gruesome end imaginable, entire civilizations wiped out, and we’re walking around taking pictures of it. I think what’s important is not so much letting enough time pass so that things don’t hurt as much, but making sure that they still hurt 20 years from now. It shouldn’t be any less…painful maybe isn’t the right word, but it shouldn’t become more palatable because time has passed.

It seems that a lot of the characters you’ve played have undergone some terrible trauma and are still trying to put themselves back together after it. What is it about that type of role that appeals to you?

Well, that’s what life’s all about, isn’t it? Everybody’s constantly being destroyed and rebuilding themselves, some more drastically than others. One of the reasons I got into acting to begin with is that I was trying to figure out how life worked. It was interesting to me to try and follow how other people, real or imaginary, would deal with problems, because I was trying to deal with my own problems. “Revolutionary Road” is seen as kind of relentlessly downbeat, but ultimately I think it’s very uplifting, because you’re getting to watch other people struggle with things that you may struggle with yourself. When you see a struggle that you may be having personally put on a big screen and in a roomful of people, then it makes you feel less crazy or alone, because you’re seeing that other people are dealing with it too. You get to see in this imaginary scenario how people might try and answer some questions or deal with some problems. So I think it’s the most constructive thing that can be done with films, really.

01222009_themissingperson4.jpgDo you get offered a lot of standard roles? Looking over your filmography, you seem to have a high percentage of ambitious projects with great directors.

I’m still not at a point where I’m calling the shots or anything — I do tend to find myself where people want me. There are certain things that I’ll say right off the bat I’m not even interested in, but it’s not like I’m getting scripts in the mail and saying “Not this one.” But, I’ve been really lucky and I’ve had the whole spectrum. Films like “The Missing Person” and “Shotgun Stories” really excite me because they’re from brilliant young writer/directors who have infinite potential and I get to be in on the ground floor. I think 23 years from now, Noah’s going to be the kind of director that people will go to MoMA to watch a retrospective of, and hopefully “The Missing Person” will be in it.

One of the things I liked about the movie is its fondness for New York, for, say, the cab driver playing his music loud and smoking out the window. As someone who lives there, are there aspects of the city you particularly love?

I love my neighborhood. I live in Red Hook in Brooklyn, which used to be apparently practically uninhabitable because it was so dangerous, but now it’s getting very gentrified.

IKEA.

Yeah, IKEA, exactly. I like it because it reminds me of the South a little bit. It’s quiet and not very crowded, it’s just a very easy place to live. I’ve had a lot of fun on Manhattan, it’s an amazing place on earth to go to, but I don’t think I’d want to live there. The thing about New York is, more than any other place I’ve ever been, you run into people on the street that you would never imagine you’d see, old friends, people just like there for a day or two. I find that all the time when I’m walking around Manhattan, running into people that I had no idea were even there.

I feel obligated to ask you an Oscary question — the announcements are on Thursday. If you get a nomination, do you have a pithy quote ready for when The Hollywood Reporter or Variety calls you to ask for a reaction?

Oh man, I don’t know. I’m pretty unprepared for that. It’s something that people have been talking about for a long time, but there’s this avalanche of awards leading up to the Oscars and I’ve been shut out of all of them. So I’m going to need to see it to believe it. I’ll probably say: “Yeah, I’m really happy. Thank you.” And then, you know, go back to my life. [laugh]

[Photos: Michael Shannon in “The Missing Person,” Visit Films, 2009]

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The Break-Up

Watch Bill Hader and Other SNL Favorites Break Character

Catch Bill Hader on the new season of Documentary Now! premiering September 14th at 10P on IFC.

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Photo Credit: NBC/YouTube

Aw, Friday. A day of happy hours that begin at 4PM and “too rotten to miss” movies like Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey on IFC’s Rotten Fridays. A truly magical day where the possibilities are endless and the regrets are just around the corner. So as we partake in the pre-weekend, sit back and enjoy another gaggle of funny videos to run out the clock.

From a despondent croissant to unintended giggling on SNL, here are the five best videos of the week.

1. SNL Cast Breaks Up

Saturday Night Live head honcho Lorne Michaels famously decries ad-libbing during the live runs — though with hilarious folks like Will Ferrell and Documentary Now!‘s Bill Hader, there are bound to be some unscripted moments that cause the cast to lose it during a sketch. Some of the greatest SNL moments involve the players or guests breaking character, as this compilation clearly shows. (Fortunately, the shame of ruining the scene has been replaced by video viralbility.)


2. Croissant Man

Pity the breakfast pastry, for its existential ennui is too much for this world. In this short courtesy of the NY Television Festival, our favorite light and flakey morning pal waxes melodramatically to his therapist and compatriots regarding the hopeless, Sartre-level gloom that hangs over every search for Life’s purpose. (Click here to see more great shorts from the NYTVF.)


3. That Time Ray Charles Beat Willie Nelson in Chess

For your guaranteed smile of the day, here’s the tale of a game of chess between crooners Ray Charles and Willie Nelson. Turns out ol’ Ray was a bona fide chess master on par with Bobby Fischer — or maybe he was just good at evening the field by making them play in the dark. As Willie puts it, “He kicked my ass three games in a row!”


4. Why Jump Scares Suck

Ever since primitive man leapt out of a bush to scare his friend, jump scares have been employed as a cheap and easy way to jolt your audience. As YouTuber Jack Nugent explains in the latest Now You See It video, it’s far more difficult to instill a growing sense of dread and suspense than just simply having a cat screech across the foreground of a dimly lit basement.


5. Best Supporting Weirdo

“Here’s to the crazy ones,” Steve Jobs famously said, paying homage to the oddballs and misfits who stand out from the pack and, more often than not, define their surroundings. In this rapid-fire supercut, some of our favorite nutjobs (like Beetlejuice, Cameron Frye and Death) are paid homage for keeping pop culture protagonists on edge and the audience entertained.

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Rotten Journey

5 Reasons Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey Is Too Rotten to Miss

Have an excellent time with Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey tonight at 8P during IFC's Rotten Fridays.

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Photo Credit: Orion Pictures/Everett Collection

We live in an age of unimaginative sequels. Filmmakers know the easiest way to cash in is to trot out the same plot and characters and hope we don’t notice. Which is why what we need now more than ever is Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, airing tonight at 8P as part of IFC’s Rotten Fridays.

Sure, the 1991 sequel to Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (coincidentally airing on IFC tonight at 6P before Bogus Journey) scored a meager 54% on the Rotten Tomatoes. (Even before the “Tomatometer” was a thing, Bogus Journey was the definition of a lackluster sequel.) But its mix of head-scratching craziness (Robots! Aliens! William Sadler as Death!) and solid gags (“You sunk my Battleship!”) have earned the flick a cult following among fans of oddball sequels. Before you tune in tonight, check out some reasons why Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey earns the coveted title of being one of IFC and Rotten Tomatoes’ movies that are “too rotten to miss.”

5. It’s Visually Most Triumphant.

Bogus Journey
Orion Pictures

The first movie may be a classic, but there’s no doubt the look of this scorned sequel took things to a whole other level. Instead of resting on Excellent Adventure‘s laurels, new director Peter Hewitt decided to go for broke creatively, offering up a vivid visual style that highlighted the film’s themes of life, death, failure and regret. While it may not be the popular opinion, there’s no doubt that as pure eye candy Bogus blew the first flick out of the water. Just ask Michael Wilmington, who wrote in the Los Angeles Times that “Bogus Journey is better than the original: more imaginative, more opulent, wilder and freer, more excitingly visualized.” Righteous review, dude!


4. Evil Bill and Ted Robots? Excellent!

Bogus Journey robots
Orion Pictures/Everett Collection

Bill and Ted have to be two of the most loveable doofuses to ever grace the silver screen, so it shouldn’t come as a shock that seeing them go full-on bad guy is a real treat. The evil robot clones of Bill and Ted still have their sleepy-eyed, stoner outlook on life — they just also happen to be bad to the bone. This fun twist brings new life to the franchise, another example of how screenwriters Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon really mixed things up. Plus, they rock!


3. Bill and Ted Go To Hell. Outstanding!

Bogus Journey
Orion Pictures

If Tim Burton ever directed a Freddy Krueger movie, it might end up looking something like Bill and Ted’s journey to Hell. While the sequence is righteously funny — with an unending descent into Hades going from terrifying to boring in the blink of an eye — it also has a dark, nightmarish quality that’s like an M.C Escher painting that knows your deepest, darkest secrets. Alex Winter’s turn as young Bill’s toothless “Granny Preston” wanting a kiss still gives us nightmares.


2. The Grim Reaper is Bodacious.

Bogus Journey
Orion Pictures

William Sadler, who’s played everything from a badass terrorist in Die Hard 2 to a loveable convict in The Shawshank Redemption, kills it as, well, Death. Heavily influence by Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal, Sadler plays the Grim Reaper as a stoic force of nature who learns to loosen up thanks to some righteous new friends. The scene where Bill and Ted best him in a batch of board games may seem a bit broad at first blush, but what are Ted “Theodore” Logan and Bill S. Preston, Esq. supposed to do? Play chess?


1. The Dudes Truly Become Wyld Stallyns.

Bogus Journey Wyld Stallyns
Orion Pictures

One of the few shortcomings from the most unrivaled first film is that we never really get to see the boys become rock legends. Thanks to some time traveling shortcuts — and a 16-month sabbatical of guitar lessons and baby making — Bogus Journey ends with the Wyld Stallyns finally living up to their righteous reputation, ready to make the music that will put an end to war and poverty and align the planets into universal harmony. Also, it’s excellent for dancing.

Catch Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey this Friday at 8P on IFC’s Rotten Fridays!

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Choose or Lose

The Funniest Political Comedies From the ’90s

Documentary Now! tackles '90s politics with "The Bunker," premiering September 14th at 10P on IFC.

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Photo Credit: 20th Century Fox/Everett Collection

While this election season seems like the greatest source of political comedy ever, it’s got nothing on the ’90s. During the original recipe Clinton Era, there were a large number of films that shined a light on the dark humor of politics.

As we gear up for the September 14th premiere of “The Bunker,” the season premiere episode of Documentary Now! that takes a look back at the tumultuous 1992 Ohio Governor race, let’s flashback to a simpler time when Donald Trump was just a rich guy happy to be in Home Alone 2. It was the time of flannel shirts, Beavis and Butt-head and politicians with their heads up their own butts. Grab some Crystal Pepsi and check out the funniest political comedies of the ’90s.

10. My Fellow Americans (1996)

Legendary actors James Garner and Jack Lemmon play two politically opposite ex-Presidents thrust together in an attempt to prove that the current President (played by Dan Aykroyd) is behind a bribery scandal that Lemmon’s Pres. Kramer is being framed for. My Fellow Americans was supposed to star Lemmon and his Grumpy Old Men costar Walter Matthau, who backed out of the project due to health problems. As great a duo as they were, James Garner seemed like the perfect choice for Pres. Douglas — with his natural Southern charm, his character is like an older Bill Clinton.


9. The Distinguished Gentleman (1992)

The Distinguished Gentleman might be the last movie you would shout out if you were ever on Family Feud and “Eddie Murphy movies” was a category, but it’s still a fun comedy with Eddie bringing the cool factor that made him a huge star in the ’80s. Here Murphy plays a con man who decides to run for a Florida Congressional seat because he shares the same name as the congressman in his district up for re-election who just died of a heart attack. After getting the backing of a Florida seniors organization (the Silver Foxes), Murphy’s appropriately named Thomas Jefferson Johnson runs as the “name you know” and ends up winning. He starts out buying into the idea of “playing the game” in order to get paid by lobbyists but eventually ends up changing his con-man ways. Hey, it’s a ’90s Eddie Murphy comedy. Things tended to work out in Eddie’s favor.


8. Black Sheep (1996)

The second buddy road trip comedy starring Chris Farley and David Spade suffers from being compared to the much funnier Tommy Boy, but there are still some hilarious moments here. Farley, in one of his final roles, plays Mike Donnelly, a well-meaning but goofy mess who manages to repeatedly muck up his brother’s campaign for Governor. Casting Tim Matheson, of Animal House fame, as the smarter and handsomer brother was a great choice and Farley and Spade get into plenty of shenanigans including encountering Gary Busey as a crazed Vietnam Vet. The scene where Farley takes the stage at a “Rock the Vote” concert will have you snorting Crystal Pepsi out of your nose.


7. The American President (1995)

Before he created The West Wing, Aaron Sorkin honed his presidential speech writing skills with the screenplay for The American President, a romantic comedy where Michael Douglas’ single Prez romances Annette Bening’s plucky environmental lobbyist. Directed by rom-com master Rob Reiner, the movie is loaded with sweet and funny moments, like when Pres. Shepherd (Douglas) calls Sydney (Bening) to ask her out the first time and she hangs up thinking it’s a prank call. We even get a sneak peek of President Bartlett, as Martin Sheen turns up as Shepherd’s no-nonsense his Chief-of-Staff. Sorkin claims he wrote the screenplay during a time when he smoked a crack. If that’s the case, every screenwriter should be give that method a try.


6. Wag the Dog (1997)

Before Dustin Hoffman joined Robert De Niro’s “circle of trust” in Meet the Fockers, the legendary actors co-starred in the David Mamet-scripted dark comedy Wag the Dog. You can’t capture the era of ’90s politics better than a film dealing with the cover-up of a Presidential sex scandal. Oddly, the movie actually came out before Monica Lewinsky and her dress entered the minds of Americans. Today, the plot of Wag the Dog might be an episode of Scandal, but if you look back to 1997, it was a biting political satire of what goes on behind-the-scenes of power and politics. De Niro plays D.C. spin-doctor Conrad Bean, who hires a Hollywood producer to stage a fake war in Albania as a distraction to help insure the President’s re-election. In a stellar cast that also includes Anne Heche and Woody Harrelson as a psychotic ex-soldier turned war hero, Hoffman stands out as a Hollywood bigwig who has a strong resemblance to Godfather producer Robert Evans. (Look for Bill Hader’s take on Evans in the new season of Documentary Now!.)


5. Bulworth (1998)

Warren Beatty was born with the looks of a guy who should run for Senate, and in Bulworth he plays a veteran senator who has lost his way and hires a hit man to kill him. Faced with his impending death, Senator Bulworth has an almost religious conversion to honesty and starts railing against the corruption of corporate money in politics. (We imagine Bernie Sanders has this one in his Netflix queue.) Like a lot of ’90s movies comedies, there is a gimmicky scene where Bulworth raps during a speech. Still, the film is so sharply written, the scene is both hilarious and a prescient look at the way white establishment types would go on to co-opt hip-hop culture.


4. Bob Roberts (1992)

If you love a good mockumentary with conservative folk songs (who doesn’t?), Bob Roberts is the movie for you. Tim Robbins wrote, directed and starred in this underrated comedy, which was inspired by a SNL sketch he had appeared in a few years earlier. Bob Roberts is a folk-singing, conservative self-made millionaire running for Congress in Pennsylvania who appears to be 100% All-American. Robbins is great at using his wholesome grin to mask the fact that his character is a drug smuggling tyrant with fits of rage. Look for everyone from Alan Rickman as Roberts’ campaign manager to a young Jack Black (see above) as a scarily enthusiastic fan.


3. Dick (1999)

Before the Watergate scandal informant was revealed, there were plenty of theories over the years as to who “Deep Throat” really was. The 1999 comedy Dick posits a possible alternate history of Nixon’s downfall as it follows two adorably upbeat and politically clueless teenage girls (energetically played by Kirsten Dunst and Michelle Williams) who randomly become “Tricky” Dick’s dog walkers after ending up meeting him on a White House field trip. Over the course of the rollicking disco-fied comedy the girls come in contact with every player in the infamous White House scandal, including a hilarious Woodward and Bernstein, played by Will Ferrell and Bruce McCulloch of Kids in the Hall fame. (The duo’s ’70s hair alone is worth watching for.) Dan Hedaya is perfectly cast as Nixon, showcasing a softer side of the infamous president after he unwittingly eats some pot cookies. An underrated comedy, Dick is a blast of ’70s fun and a great showcase for its cast of rising stars.


2. Dave (1993)

Dave is a classic everyman-turned-hero story with a winning Kevin Kline as an affable guy who just happens to be a dead-ringer for the leader of the free world. When Pres. Mitchell has a stroke while fooling around with his mistress, his Chief of Staff (Frank Langella) hatches a plan to temporarily have Kline’s Dave fill in for the President. Langella and Kline are great together, and the scene where Dave calls his accountant friend (played by Charles Grodin) to come over to the White House and balance the budget is just one of the sharp ways director Ivan Reitman and screenwriter Gary Ross (Big) poke fun at politics. Look for Sigourney Weaver, reteaming with Reitman after the Ghostbusters movies, as the First Lady who slowly begins to realize something is off about her Husband-in-Chief.


1. Election (1999)

If you think national politics is cutthroat, just wait until you meet high school president candidate Tracy Flick. Tracy, as played by Reese Witherspoon, is like a teenage version of Amy Poehler’s Leslie Knope, but without the likeable personality. Mathew Broderick hits all the right notes as the teacher who starts off being respected but finds his whole life falling apart while overseeing the election. A dark comedy that shows the downside of driven political candidates, Election is a film that remains topical with every new voting season.

Watch MTV’s Tabitha Soren covering the heated 1992 Ohio Governor race below. To find out who wins, catch the season premiere of Documentary Now! September 14th at 10P on IFC.

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