DID YOU READ

Michael Shannon on “The Missing Person”

Posted by on

01222009_themissingperson1.jpgMichael Shannon was nominated for an Oscar today for his superb supporting role in Sam Mendes’ otherwise glossily imperfect period drama “Revolutionary Road,” so the world’s about to be paying him a lot of well-deserved attention. But if you’ve seen him act before, on the screen or on stage, you’ve already noticed him. Shannon’s established himself in the past few years as the guy who can walk away with a film under the noses of established stars — see “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead,” see the aforementioned Mendes film, or better yet, see the edgier lead roles he’s taken in indies like “Bug,” “Shotgun Stories” or “The Missing Person,” which had its premiere at Sundance this year. Directed by Noah Buschel, the film finds Shannon playing John Rosow, a private eye in the most noir tradition who’s hired to follow a man who turns out to have been reported dead during the September 11th attacks. Delving into this mystery forces Rosow to confront his own trauma related to the attacks, and to return to the city he’d tried to leave behind. I sat down with Shannon in Park City on Monday to talk about the film, New York and his award chances.

How did you get involved with “The Missing Person”? What did you like about it?

I’m friends with Amy Ryan, and she was in a film that Noah made called “Cassady,” about Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac. One afternoon, me and Amy were having coffee, just shooting the breeze and she said, “I gotta go. I was in this movie and the director wants me to see a cut of it. You could probably come, if you wanted.” I like the subject, because I guess all boys have a fantasy about being Jack Kerouac, so I went and saw it on a little editing bay and thought it was incredible, one of the best movies I’d seen in a long time. Neal was having a reading of the screenplay of “The Missing Person,” and he asked me if I would just do it. It was a lot of fun, and a couple months later, he’s like, “Well, I think we’re going to make the movie. You want to do it?”

Did you model John Rosow on the classic noir detectives? There seems to be a lot of that in him, from his suits to his gin-drinking to his ability to take whacks on the head without apparent brain damage.

01222009_themissingperson2.jpgA lot of it was from the outside in — originally in the script, John’s hair is white, so a big point of contention for a long time was about how we were going to turn my hair white, because it’s basically impossible. Even if you pour Clorox all over your head, it still only gets platinum blond. I got the spray-on stuff, and that just looks silly. It was poetic and whatever, but I said “I don’t think it’s going to work.” So we went to a salon in the East Village and there’s this person who makes $200 to cut somebody’s hair standing there, she’s like, “So what do you want?” And [Noah say], “I want Steve McQueen.” As she’s cutting my hair, I’m looking in the mirror, and started the whole process for me. When I had the haircut and I had the suit, it just clicked. I didn’t go out cruising around with detectives. I know this is probably frustrating to hear because it’s not very enlightening, but I usually find most of the inspiration is just in the writing of the script — that’s one of the reasons I wanted to do [“The Missing Person”], the script was so freakin’ good, you’d have to be a moron to mess it up.

A lot of people say “Oh, you’re like Elliott Gould in ‘The Long Goodbye.'” I’m like “I’ve never seen ‘The Long Goodbye,’ but that’s great.” It was very low budget and there were no amenities, as it were, so after 10 hours of sitting around smoking cigarettes, you get to that point naturally.

How stylized would you say John is? I was actually going to be one of those people to bring up Elliott Gould, because they do seem awfully similar — John doesn’t seem to know about cell phones that can take pictures, for instance, he seems a little out of time and place.

The thing about the character that’s revealed throughout the course of the movie is that he’s not so much a detective as he is…I know this is going to sound corny as hell, but he is the missing person. To me, the whole beginning of the story… it’s almost like he could be dreaming this whole thing, that he’s really just some drunk laying in his bed imagining that he’s a detective. Obviously, he’s desperately searching for something to fill the gigantic hole in his heart, [because] his wife worked at the World Trade Center and died there. The style of it is for me is very much like this could possibly all be an illusion to begin with.

01222009_themissingperson3.jpg9/11 has worked its way indirectly into a lot of films, but there still aren’t many that have taken it on directly. You’ve acted in two of the ones I can think of — “The Missing Person” and “World Trade Center.” What’s your opinion on those who’ve made the claim that it’s too soon to deal with it on film?

To me, that’s insulting to the passage of time. To say that Vietnam is more palatable now because it was a few decades ago is just as distasteful to me as saying that something isn’t palatable because it just happened yesterday. These things will always be tragedies. I was just at Machu Picchu in Peru and there were all these people walking around in little tour groups with their guides, taking pictures and looking at the mountains, and I just kept thinking [the Incas] met the most gruesome end imaginable, entire civilizations wiped out, and we’re walking around taking pictures of it. I think what’s important is not so much letting enough time pass so that things don’t hurt as much, but making sure that they still hurt 20 years from now. It shouldn’t be any less…painful maybe isn’t the right word, but it shouldn’t become more palatable because time has passed.

It seems that a lot of the characters you’ve played have undergone some terrible trauma and are still trying to put themselves back together after it. What is it about that type of role that appeals to you?

Well, that’s what life’s all about, isn’t it? Everybody’s constantly being destroyed and rebuilding themselves, some more drastically than others. One of the reasons I got into acting to begin with is that I was trying to figure out how life worked. It was interesting to me to try and follow how other people, real or imaginary, would deal with problems, because I was trying to deal with my own problems. “Revolutionary Road” is seen as kind of relentlessly downbeat, but ultimately I think it’s very uplifting, because you’re getting to watch other people struggle with things that you may struggle with yourself. When you see a struggle that you may be having personally put on a big screen and in a roomful of people, then it makes you feel less crazy or alone, because you’re seeing that other people are dealing with it too. You get to see in this imaginary scenario how people might try and answer some questions or deal with some problems. So I think it’s the most constructive thing that can be done with films, really.

01222009_themissingperson4.jpgDo you get offered a lot of standard roles? Looking over your filmography, you seem to have a high percentage of ambitious projects with great directors.

I’m still not at a point where I’m calling the shots or anything — I do tend to find myself where people want me. There are certain things that I’ll say right off the bat I’m not even interested in, but it’s not like I’m getting scripts in the mail and saying “Not this one.” But, I’ve been really lucky and I’ve had the whole spectrum. Films like “The Missing Person” and “Shotgun Stories” really excite me because they’re from brilliant young writer/directors who have infinite potential and I get to be in on the ground floor. I think 23 years from now, Noah’s going to be the kind of director that people will go to MoMA to watch a retrospective of, and hopefully “The Missing Person” will be in it.

One of the things I liked about the movie is its fondness for New York, for, say, the cab driver playing his music loud and smoking out the window. As someone who lives there, are there aspects of the city you particularly love?

I love my neighborhood. I live in Red Hook in Brooklyn, which used to be apparently practically uninhabitable because it was so dangerous, but now it’s getting very gentrified.

IKEA.

Yeah, IKEA, exactly. I like it because it reminds me of the South a little bit. It’s quiet and not very crowded, it’s just a very easy place to live. I’ve had a lot of fun on Manhattan, it’s an amazing place on earth to go to, but I don’t think I’d want to live there. The thing about New York is, more than any other place I’ve ever been, you run into people on the street that you would never imagine you’d see, old friends, people just like there for a day or two. I find that all the time when I’m walking around Manhattan, running into people that I had no idea were even there.

I feel obligated to ask you an Oscary question — the announcements are on Thursday. If you get a nomination, do you have a pithy quote ready for when The Hollywood Reporter or Variety calls you to ask for a reaction?

Oh man, I don’t know. I’m pretty unprepared for that. It’s something that people have been talking about for a long time, but there’s this avalanche of awards leading up to the Oscars and I’ve been shut out of all of them. So I’m going to need to see it to believe it. I’ll probably say: “Yeah, I’m really happy. Thank you.” And then, you know, go back to my life. [laugh]

[Photos: Michael Shannon in “The Missing Person,” Visit Films, 2009]

Watch More
Brockmire-Hank-Azaria-characters-blog

Thank Azaria

Best. Characters. Ever.

Our favorite Hank Azaria characters.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giphy

Hank Azaria may well be the most prolific voice and character actor of our time. The work he’s done for The Simpsons alone has earned him a permanent place in the pop culture zeitgeist. And now he’s bringing another character to the mainstream: a washed-up sports announcer named Jim Brockmire, in the aptly titled new series Brockmire.

We’re looking forward to it. So much so that we want to look backward, too, with a short-but-sweet retrospective of some of Azaria’s important characters. Shall we begin?

Half The Recurring Simpsons Characters

He’s Comic Book Guy. He’s Chief Wiggum. He’s Apu. He’s Cletus. He’s Snake. He’s Superintendent Chalmers. He’s the Sea Captain. He’s Kurt “Can I Borrow A Feeling” Van Houten. He’s Professor Frink. He’s Carl. And he’s many more. But most importantly he’s Moe Szyslak, the staple character Azaria has voiced since his very first audition for The Simpsons.

Oh, and He’s Frank Grimes

For all the regular Simpsons characters Azaria has played over the years, his most brilliant performance may have been a one-off: Frank Grimes, the scrappy bootstrapper who worked tirelessly all his life for honest, incremental, and easily-undermined success. Azaria’s portrayal of this character was nuanced, emotional, and simply magical.

Patches O’Houlihan

Dodgeball is a “sport of violence, exclusion and degradation.” as Hank Azaria generously points out in his brief but crucial cameo in Dodgeball. That’s sage wisdom. Try applying his “five D’s” to your life on and off the court and enjoy the results.

Harold Zoid

Of Futurama fame. The crazy uncle of Dr. Zoidberg, Harold Zoid was once a lion (or lobster) of the silver screen until Smell-o-vision forced him into retirement.

Agador

The Birdcage was significant for many reasons, and the comic genius of Hank Azaria’s character “Agador” sits somewhere towards the top of that list. If you haven’t seen this movie, shame on you.

Gargamel

Nobody else could make a live-action Gargamel possible.

Ed Cochran

From Ray Donovan. Great character, great last name [editorial note: the author of this article may be bias].

Kahmunra, The Thinker, Abe Lincoln

All in the Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian, a file that let Azaria flex his voice acting and live-action muscles in one fell swoop.

The Blue Raja

Mystery Men has everything, including a fatal case of Smash Mouth. Azaria’s iconic superhero makes the shortlist of redeemable qualities, though.

Dr. Huff

Huff put Azaria in a leading role, and it was good. So good that there is no good gif of it. Internet? More like Inter-not.

Learn more about Hank Azaria’s newest claim to fame right here, and don’t miss the premiere of Brockmire April 5 at 10P on IFC.

Watch More
Sneak_Peek

Flame Out

Brockmire and Other Public Implosions

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on

There’s less than a month until the Brockmire premiere, and to say we’re excited would be an insulting understatement. It’s not just that it stars Hank Azaria, who can do no wrong (and yes, that’s including Mystery Men, which is only cringeworthy because of Smash Mouth). It’s that the whole backstory of the titular character, Jim Brockmire, is the stuff of legends. A one-time iconic sportscaster who won the hearts of fans and players alike, he fell from grace after an unfortunate personal event triggered a seriously public meltdown. See for yourself in the NSFW Funny or Die digital short that spawned the IFC series:

See? NSFW and spectacularly catastrophic in a way that could almost be real. Which got us thinking: What are some real-life sports fails that have nothing to do with botched athletics and everything to do with going tragically off script? The internet is a dark and dirty place, friends, but these three examples are pretty special and mostly safe for work…

Disgruntled Sports Reporter

His co-anchor went offsides and he called it like he saw it.

Jim Rome vs Jim “Not Chris” Everett

You just don’t heckle a professional athlete when you’re within striking distance. Common sense.

Carl Lewis’s National Anthem

He killed it! As in murdered. It’s dead.

To see more moments just like these, we recommend spending a day in your pajamas combing through the muckiness of the internet. But to see something that’s Brockmire-level funny without having to clear your browser history, check out the sneak peeks and extras here.

Don’t miss the premiere of Brockmire April 5 at 10P on IFC.

Watch More
POR_710_D1

Mirror, Mirror

Portlandia Season 7 In Hindsight

Portlandia Season 7 Now Available Online and on the IFC App.

Posted by on

Another season of Portlandia is behind us, and oh what a season it was. We laughed. We cried. And we chuckled uncomfortably while glancing nervously around the room. Like every season before it, the latest Portlandia has held a mirror up to ridiculousness of modern American life, but more than ever that same mirror has reflected our social reality in ways that are at once hysterical and sneakily thought-provoking. Here are just a few of the issues they tackled:

Nationalism

So long, America, Portland is out! And yes, the idea of Portland seceding is still less ludicrous than building a wall.

Men’s Rights

We all saw this coming. Exit gracefully, dudes.

Protests

Whatever you stand for, stand for it together. Or with at least one other person.

Free Love

No matter who we are or how we love, deep down we all have the ability to get stalky.

Social Status

Modern self-esteem basically hinges on likes, so this isn’t really a stretch at all.

These moments are just the tip of the iceberg, and much more can be found in the full seventh season of #Portlandia, available right now #online and on the #IFC app.

via GIPHY

Watch More
Powered by ZergNet